Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment

Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment

Living with ILD isn’t easy. It’s why we’re here to help.

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an umbrella term for a general type of lung disease that encompasses more than 100 different types of pulmonary conditions affecting oxygen absorption within the lungs. For those who suffer from the disease, it can present symptoms such as fatigue, dry cough, weight loss, acute pneumonia, cyanosis (bluish discoloration of the skin), and shortness of breath during rest or exertion.

Needless to say, the expression of these symptoms can be incredibly unpleasant for those with this form of chronic lung disease. And though there are forms of treatment available, it’s important to understand your disease and how to navigate it in order to keep yourself in the best health possible.

Thankfully, that’s where we come in.

With your health in mind, the Lung Health Institute is here to breakdown Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment in order to give you the information you need to improve your health one day at a time.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages

We’ll begin with the most important: ILD stages, because it has a direct effect on your potential life expectancy. In determining the progression and advancement of your interstitial lung disease, your physician or pulmonologist will typically go through two primary methods of judging your respiratory health: the GOLD System and the BODE Index. These two tests are designed to assess your pulmonary condition through a variety of different tests such as a spirometry assessment (or PFT), as well as several other metrics like a 6-minute walk test, oximeter results, and arterial blood-gas analysis.

This can sound like a lot, but trust us, the more information your doctor or pulmonologist can gather, the better. It’ll give them the maximum amount of information available in order to create the best treatment plan for your health.

The typical breakdown of ILD stages are as follows:

  • Mild- meaning you have 5+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Moderate- meaning you have 3-5+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Severe- meaning you have 3+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Advanced- meaning you have < 3 years with appropriate treatment

Although these are the general guidelines of ILD staging, as with any progressive lung disease, these life expectancies are largely dependent on the individual. This means that through proper treatment, diet and exercise, it’s possible to exceed these figures while maintaining a healthy quality of life.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Prognosis

In the treatment of any disease there’s initially a prognosis given. A prognosis, in short, is essentially an outlook on your disease’s eventual progression. It’s a directive on what the development of the disease will look like moving forward and how it will affect you.

In the case of ILD, the prognosis largely depends on the treatment regimen as well as cause of the disease’s development, but generally you can expect the following developments in your health:

  • Fatigue
  • Cyanosis
  • Weight loss
  • Acute pneumonia
  • Shortness of breath
  • Weight loss
  • Abnormal enlargement of the fingernail base
  • Dry, persistent cough
  • High blood pressure (in some cases)
  • Heart failure (in some cases)

With a clear understanding of what’s to come and a strong grasp of your disease, it’s time to talk about what you can do about it, and how a few changes to your lifestyle and treatment options can have a big effect on your overall health.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Treatment Options

In treating ILD you have a variety of medical treatment options ranging from inhalers, medication, cellular therapy and supplemental oxygen. And though these treatment options have shown efficacy in addressing the symptoms of lung disease—and in the case of cellular therapy, disease progression overall—there are a variety of things you can do today that can give your health and life expectancy a small boost.

To start:

  • Quit Smoking Not only can it actively take years off of your life, but it is likely to make your disease symptoms significantly worse. And trust, although the symptoms of ILD may not be bad enough for you to change now, by the time they progress to the point of being unbearable, it may be too late to go back.
  • Change Your Diet – It doesn’t have to be as extreme as never eating meat again and going vegetarian. Start with portions. Try to eat more grains (rice and pasta) than you eat meat. From there, drop the pasta and add in more vegetables. If you want to eat dessert, swap that out with some good and well-prepared fruit. Even strawberries with a little whipped or cream cheese would be a healthier pairing than a big German chocolate cake.
  • Get Out and Exercise We say this one a lot but it’s important to get your blood pumping and moving through your body easier. Why? Because your blood carries your oxygen to the parts of the body that need it. Even if it’s doing standing squats in front of the TV or walking to the mailbox, start small and build up from there. If you can keep yourself disciplined and consistent in your goals, you’ll be walking marathons in no time.

Moving Forward with Interstitial Lung Disease

A diagnosis of ILD is by no means the end. In fact, it’s just the beginning of your journey to better health and a better quality of life. And the first step is quitting smoking if you haven’t already. Even though we always recommend quitting smoking first as a crucial step to better health, the second is to address your general health through simple diet and exercise.

With these behavioral changes, it’s possible to greatly affect the pronouncement of symptoms within those with emphysema, COPD and pulmonary fibrosis. However, when lifestyle changes fail to improve your quality of life in the way that you may expect, it may be time to consider cellular therapy. Centers for Respiratory Health offers PRP-PBMC cellular therapy, which may improve your overall lung health and potentially allow you to Breathe Easier and improve your quality of life.

For more information on cellular therapy and what it could mean for your life moving forward, contact us today or call us at 866-638-4776. Our Patient Care Specialists and board-certified medical providers are ready to walk you through our treatment options, talk through your current health and medical history, and determine a qualifying treatment plan that works best for you.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

What Is the Life Expectancy for Bronchiectasis?

What Is the Life Expectancy for Bronchiectasis?

For somebody with bronchiectasis, life expectancy can be a significant concern. In the same class as COPD and emphysema, bronchiectasis is a chronic obstructive lung condition that leads to pulmonary inflammation and infection. Over time, the walls of the bronchi thicken and mucus builds up, scarring and damaging the lungs. One of the most frustrating parts of bronchiectasis is the periodic flare-ups, which can make it difficult to breathe — and will get worse over time.
There are two types of bronchiectasis — congenital and acquired (non-congenital) — and prognosis depends largely on which type you have. Congenital forms such as those caused by cystic fibrosis may have poorer outcomes than acquired types, which are often caused by damage to the airway or repeated lung infections rather than smoking or inhaling contaminants.
Bronchiectasis itself does not shorten your lifespan, but certain symptoms and complications may arise that could decrease life expectancy in those with the disease. However, it is important to see your doctor for an exam and consultation to talk about your specific situation and contributing factors.

What complications may arise from bronchiectasis?

Complications of bronchiectasis include:
Pneumonia. Due to the buildup of mucus in the lungs, some patients may have bouts of pneumonia. Pneumonia has many possible causes, but most often it is a complication of the flu. There were 43,000 deaths from pneumonia in 2019, so it’s important to stay on top of your health when living with bronchiectasis. During cold and flu season, wash your hands frequently, avoid crowded places and wear a mask if necessary.
Massive hemoptysis. This can happen if a blood vessel supplying the lung splits open and causes bleeding; the blood is then coughed up. Symptoms include coughing up more than 100ml (about one-third of a soda can) of blood within a 24-hour period, breathing difficulties, lightheadedness, dizziness, or cold and clammy hands. If you suspect you might have massive hemoptysis, call 911.
Heart failure. A study showed that patients with bronchiectasis may be at a higher risk of heart disease and stroke than the general population.
Respiratory failure. Because of the damage caused to the lungs over time and the higher chance of infection, patients with bronchiectasis may eventually go into respiratory failure. This is one of the more common causes of death for those with bronchiectasis.

Cellular therapy treats bronchiectasis at the source

While certain medications and treatments can address the symptoms of bronchiectasis, cellular therapy is a type of regenerative treatment that can treat chronic lung disorders like bronchiectasis by targeting the actual source of the condition — the lungs.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

 

Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment

Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment

Living with ILD isn’t easy. It’s why we’re here to help.

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an umbrella term for a general type of lung disease that encompasses more than 100 different types of pulmonary conditions affecting oxygen absorption within the lungs. For those who suffer from the disease, it can present symptoms such as fatigue, dry cough, weight loss, acute pneumonia, cyanosis (bluish discoloration of the skin), and shortness of breath during rest or exertion.

Needless to say, the expression of these symptoms can be incredibly unpleasant for those with this form of chronic lung disease. And though there are forms of treatment available, it’s important to understand your disease and how to navigate it in order to keep yourself in the best health possible.

Thankfully, that’s where we come in.

With your health in mind, the Lung Health Institute is here to breakdown Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment in order to give you the information you need to improve your health one day at a time.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages

We’ll begin with the most important: ILD stages, because it has a direct effect on your potential life expectancy. In determining the progression and advancement of your interstitial lung disease, your physician or pulmonologist will typically go through two primary methods of judging your respiratory health: the GOLD System and the BODE Index. These two tests are designed to assess your pulmonary condition through a variety of different tests such as a spirometry assessment (or PFT), as well as several other metrics like a 6-minute walk test, oximeter results, and arterial blood-gas analysis.

This can sound like a lot, but trust us, the more information your doctor or pulmonologist can gather, the better. It’ll give them the maximum amount of information available in order to create the best treatment plan for your health.

The typical breakdown of ILD stages are as follows:

  • Mild- meaning you have 5+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Moderate- meaning you have 3-5+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Severe- meaning you have 3+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Advanced- meaning you have < 3 years with appropriate treatment

Although these are the general guidelines of ILD staging, as with any progressive lung disease, these life expectancies are largely dependent on the individual. This means that through proper treatment, diet and exercise, it’s possible to exceed these figures while maintaining a healthy quality of life.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Prognosis

Interstitial Lung Disease Prognosis

In the treatment of any disease there’s initially a prognosis given. A prognosis, in short, is essentially an outlook on your disease’s eventual progression. It’s a directive on what the development of the disease will look like moving forward and how it will affect you.

In the case of ILD, the prognosis largely depends on the treatment regimen as well as cause of the disease’s development, but generally you can expect the following developments in your health:

  • Fatigue
  • Cyanosis
  • Weight loss
  • Acute pneumonia
  • Shortness of breath
  • Weight loss
  • Abnormal enlargement of the fingernail base
  • Dry, persistent cough
  • High blood pressure (in some cases)
  • Heart failure (in some cases)

With a clear understanding of what’s to come and a strong grasp of your disease, it’s time to talk about what you can do about it, and how a few changes to your lifestyle and treatment options can have a big effect on your overall health.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Treatment Options

In treating ILD you have a variety of medical treatment options ranging from inhalers, medication, cellular therapy and supplemental oxygen. And though these treatment options have shown efficacy in addressing the symptoms of lung disease—and in the case of cellular therapy, disease progression overall—there are a variety of things you can do today that can give your health and life expectancy a small boost.

To start:

  • Quit Smoking Not only can it actively take years off of your life, but it is likely to make your disease symptoms significantly worse. And trust, although the symptoms of ILD may not be bad enough for you to change now, by the time they progress to the point of being unbearable, it may be too late to go back.
  • Change Your Diet – It doesn’t have to be as extreme as never eating meat again and going vegetarian. Start with portions. Try to eat more grains (rice and pasta) than you eat meat. From there, drop the pasta and add in more vegetables. If you want to eat dessert, swap that out with some good and well-prepared fruit. Even strawberries with a little whipped or cream cheese would be a healthier pairing than a big German chocolate cake.
  • Get Out and Exercise We say this one a lot but it’s important to get your blood pumping and moving through your body easier. Why? Because your blood carries your oxygen to the parts of the body that need it. Even if it’s doing standing squats in front of the TV or walking to the mailbox, start small and build up from there. If you can keep yourself disciplined and consistent in your goals, you’ll be walking marathons in no time.

Moving Forward with Interstitial Lung Disease

A diagnosis of ILD is by no means the end. In fact, it’s just the beginning of your journey to better health and a better quality of life. And the first step is quitting smoking if you haven’t already. Even though we always recommend quitting smoking first as a crucial step to better health, the second is to address your general health through simple diet and exercise.

With these behavioral changes, it’s possible to greatly affect the pronouncement of symptoms within those with emphysema, COPD and pulmonary fibrosis. However, when lifestyle changes fail to improve your quality of life in the way that you may expect, it may be time to consider cellular therapy. Centers for Respiratory Health offers PRP-PBMC cellular therapy, which may improve your overall lung health and potentially allow you to Breathe Easier and improve your quality of life.

For more information on cellular therapy and what it could mean for your life moving forward, contact us today or call us at 866-638-4776. Our Patient Care Specialists and board-certified medical providers are ready to walk you through our treatment options, talk through your current health and medical history, and determine a qualifying treatment plan that works best for you.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

Can a Plant-Based Diet Cure COPD?

Can a Plant-Based Diet Cure COPD?

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), more than 16 million Americans have been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Unfortunately, there is no current cure for COPD, and that includes eating a plant-based diet. 

Plant-based diets encourage people to eat more healthy and organic foods, such as vegetables, berries, seeds and nuts. This diet also emphasizes the eating of minimally processed foods, and its proponents advise against eating highly processed foods like white sugar and flour. Although it can’t cure COPD, moving to a plant-based diet can have several important benefits for COPD patients. 

3 Benefits Plant-Based Diets Can Have for COPD Patients

COPD patients should be on the lookout for lifestyle changes that can help decrease their symptoms. If you’re interested, you can talk to your doctor about  moving to a plant-based diet. Such a diet may offer COPD patients 3 specific benefits: 

  • Helps decrease your weight — The lungs of an overweight person must work harder to supply their body with oxygen. This can be an issue for COPD patients who already have decreased lung function. Plant-based diets have been shown to help decrease weight. In fact, a review of 12 studies on plant-based diets reports that people on these diets lost about 4.5 pounds in an average time of 18 weeks
  • Decreases inflammation — Plant-based diets encourage people to eat more antioxidant-rich foods. This includes foods like spinach, kale, raspberries and blueberries, to name a few. Antioxidants are molecules that help to neutralize free radicals in the body that cause inflammation. There’s even a medical study with findings that increasing the levels of antioxidants in your body can help it more effectively deal with the inflammation that COPD causes. 
  • Decreases exacerbation risk — An exacerbation is a sudden and severe worsening of COPD symptoms, and 1 study reports that COPD patients could have more than 3 exacerbations annually. Getting more vitamins from the foods you eat could help decrease your risk of exacerbations. A medical study reports that vitamins A, C, E and D could help to achieve this goal, and eating a plant-based diet can help you consume more vegetables and fruits that are high in these vitamins. 

Centers for Respiratory Health Offers Natural Treatment Options for COPD

At Centers for Respiratory Health, we are an innovative leader of regenerative medicine dedicated to providing cellular therapies to help patients with chronic lung disorders and improve overall lung health. We offer an innovative wellness approach to your health and provide our patients with a potentially more effective way to improve overall lung health. Our goal is to improve our patients’ quality of life and help our patients Breathe Easier.

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.