CT Masks for COPD

CT Masks for COPD

NOTE: THE CT MASK DOES NOT PROTECT YOU FROM COVID-19

CT Masks for COPD

Whether you live in a colder climate year-round or you experience a couple months of cold weather yearly, if you have a chronic lung disease, you understand how changes in the weather can affect your health.  People with COPD, or another form of chronic lung disease such as pulmonary fibrosis, may experience worsened symptoms during cold weather because the cold air is dry and removes moisture from the bronchial passages, creating inflammation which narrows airways. However, you can take proactive steps to keep your lungs warm. Besides wearing warm clothing and keeping oxygen tubing underneath your clothes, wearing a mask designed for people with lung disease, such as the CT Mask for COPD, could help you breathe more easily.

What is the CT Mask for COPD and how does it work?

CT Masks for COPD

Made by Air Guard Medical Products Co., the CT Mask was made to give people with lung disease, such as asthma and COPD, the ability to breathe warm, moist air outdoors in cold weather. Inside the CT Mask is a thermal exchange module, which affects a heat exchange cycle, regulating air flow through its chambers. The heat and moisture from your exhaled breath is captured inside the module and transferred into your next inhaled breath as warm, moist, fresh air.

What are the product details for the CT Mask for COPD?

  • Adjustable straps for the best fit
  • Durable enough for 90-120 washings
  • Hand-washable in warm water with non-allergic soap; air-dry
  • Made with soft Polartec fleece, antimicrobial copper mesh, Poron, and napped Lycra jersey materials

How cold does it need to be to use the CT Mask for COPD?

CT Masks for COPD

Each individual is different. For some people, temperatures in the fifties are uncomfortable. For others, temperatures in the forties and lower feel cold. If it feels cold outside to you, then it’s fine to wear your CT Mask.

What are the risks and benefits of wearing the CT Mask for COPD?

CT Masks for COPD

The CT Mask is not for everyone, and some people may feel that the mask restricts their airflow, causing them discomfort. If this happens, stop wearing the mask.

In addition to lung benefits, Air Guard Medical states that breathing warm air when you’re in cold weather helps keep your entire body warmer. The CT Mask should not fog eyeglasses when worn properly. Most outdoor activities can be enjoyed while wearing CT Masks. Before using the mask or changing your activity level, it’s important to discuss your activities and use of the CT Mask with your doctor. If you and your physician decide that a CT Mask is right for you, we encourage you to check your local stores for availability. The CT Mask is not available for purchase at Centers for Respiratory Health.

What else can I do to treat COPD?

CT Masks for COPD

With advancements in medications, lifestyle modifications, assistive devices, and alternative medicine, there is hope for people with lung disease. If you feel that your symptoms are worsened by cold weather, talk with your doctor about options to help you stay active, such as wearing a CT Mask for COPD. Trying various lifestyle modifications and treatment options, such as cellular therapy, could improve your quality of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

Stage 4 COPD: End-Stage COPD and You

Stage 4 COPD: End-Stage COPD and You

As you know, there are four total stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), ranging from mild to very severe. Stage 1 COPD is also known as mild COPD, and stage 2 COPD is the moderate stage at which recognizable symptoms often first appear. As COPD progresses, your COPD stage will also change to reflect the severity of your symptoms. Severe stage COPD, or stage 3 COPD, causes significant changes in symptoms, lung health and overall health. The final stage of COPD is also known as stage 4, or very severe. Here’s everything you need to know about stage 4 COPD or end-stage COPD.

Determining Stage 4 COPD

As in previous stages of COPD, your doctor will likely use the GOLD System and the BODE Index to identify stage 4 COPD. By this stage, you’ve likely had multiple lung function tests and exercise tolerance tests, such as pulmonary function tests and 6-minute walk tests. Seeing your doctor regularly is important during any stage of COPD, but it’s especially important during stage 4.

In the GOLD System, stage 4 COPD is categorized as end-stage COPD with a lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) than stage 3, or those with a stage 3 FEV1 and low blood oxygen levels.

Stage 4 COPD

During stage 4 COPD, many people have significant airflow limitations, which often drastically affect their lives. In fact, simple tasks, such as taking a shower, making the bed or cooking a small meal, leave them feeling exhausted and completely out of breath. While lung function can vary, typically during stage 4, lung function drops to 30 percent or less.

Your doctor will closely monitor your pulmonary health and overall health. Because COPD flare-ups worsen symptoms and can be life-threatening, your doctor will work with you to manage and prevent them.

If you experience low blood oxygen levels, your organs, cells and tissues are unable to receive enough oxygen. Oxygen is essential to a properly functioning body, but many people with COPD have difficulty getting adequate oxygen. Your doctor may prescribe oxygen therapy to help you receive more oxygen.

For some people, other conditions that can occur along with COPD may worsen as well, such a heart failure. If you notice a change in your symptoms or feel ill, your doctor will likely want to make sure you’re not having a COPD flare-up.

Stage 4 COPD Treatments

Stage 4 COPD: End-Stage COPD and You

COPD is a progressive disease, and there’s no cure. However, you and your doctor will work together to develop or modify your treatment plan to best fit your needs. There are many different treatment options, such as medications, lifestyle changes and alternative therapies.

For the management of stable stage 4 COPD, your doctor may prescribe inhalers, corticosteroids to help you breathe better. For example, your doctor may prescribe inhalers called bronchodilators, which help relax and open your airways. Your doctor may also prescribe steroids to reduce inflammation and prevent flare-ups.

Sometimes you may need a type of inhaler called a combination inhaler. Combination medications combine two types of medicine in the same drug, such as a bronchodilator and a steroid in the same inhaler.

In the event of a COPD flare-up, your doctor could prescribe antibiotics, oral steroids or even hospitalization. Remember to report any changes in your symptoms or overall health to your doctor. It’s also important to stay up to date on your flu and pneumonia vaccinations to reduce and prevent flare-ups from happening.

For many people, alternative treatment, such as cellular therapy has helped them get back to their favorite activities. In fact, some people have reported reducing their oxygen therapy use after treatment, feeling better and breathing easier. Cellular therapy works differently than traditional medications. While traditional medications can help manage COPD symptoms, cellular therapy may help to promote healing from within the lungs, potentially addressing disease progression.

Stage 4 COPD Lifestyle Changes

Your doctor may also recommend certain lifestyle changes. One of the most important lifestyle changes you can make is to quit smoking. Smoke is a lung irritant and trigger for COPD symptoms. While quitting smoking and remaining smoke-free is challenging, there are smoking cessation tips, treatments and groups to help you succeed.

Eating a healthy diet and getting plenty of exercise have been proven to help people with COPD enjoy a better quality of life. Too much salt can worsen COPD and heart problems, so try seasoning your food with herbs instead. Gentle exercises like yoga, walking and Tai Chi are excellent options for people in any stage of COPD with limited mobility.

Combining lifestyle changes, medications and alternative therapies, like cellular therapy, can help you live a more active life. COPD prognosis and life expectancy vary; however, from stage 1 COPD to stage 4 COPD, these treatment options are available.

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality of life. 

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Lung Capacity: What Does it Mean?

Lung Capacity: What Does it Mean?

For those of us with chronic pulmonary conditions, we may frequently hear our doctors and other people refer to our lung capacity. With all of the terminology that gets thrown around with a medical condition, sometimes it can be confusing breaking everything down. In this post, we’re going to take a look at what lung capacity is, how it’s affected by pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or pulmonary fibrosis, and what you can do to increase your lung capacity.

What is Lung Capacity?

Total lung capacity, or TLC, refers to the maximum amount of air that your lungs can hold. Typically, men have a greater lung capacity than women. At rest a man’s lungs can hold about 1.5 pints of air, while women’s lungs can hold around 0.6 to 0.8 pints. However, most of us do not use our full lung capacity.

According to Jonathan P. Parsons, M.D., professor of internal medicine, associate director of Clinical Services and director of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine at the Ohio State University Asthma Center, “The lungs are over-engineered to accomplish the job that we ask them to do. In healthy people without chronic lung disease, even at maximum exercise intensity, we only use 70 percent of the possible lung capacity.”

Why is Lung Capacity Important?

Lung capacity predicts health and longevity. A 29-year study published in Chest concluded that lung capacity is a long-term predictor of respiratory mortality, and should be used as a tool for general health assessment. Because of this, people with chronic pulmonary conditions should pay particular care to monitoring lung capacity. Taking spirometry tests is a good way to measure lung function . A spirometry test takes several measures, such as how much air you can exhale in one second, called an FEV1 score, or forced expiratory volume in 1 second.

Our lung capacity naturally declines with age, starting at age 30. By the age of 50, our lung capacity may be reduced by as much as 50 percent. This means that the older you get, the harder it is for your lungs to breathe in and hold air. When we breathe in less oxygen, our body and cells also receive less oxygen, forcing our heart to work harder to pump oxygen throughout the body. The heart working overtime long-term can lead to heart failure. Earlier symptoms of reduced lung capacity include shortness of breath, decreased stamina and reduced endurance and frequent respiratory infections.

How is Lung Capacity Affected by COPD?

COPD affects the quantity of air that can move in and out of your lungs. The more advanced the COPD is, the harder it is for your lungs to breathe in and to exhale air. The more severe the stage of COPD, the lower the lung capacity and function. However, lung capacity and lung function are not the same.

While lung capacity refers to the maximum amount of air that your lungs are able to hold, lung function refers to how quickly you can inhale and exhale air from your lungs and also how effectively your lungs both oxygenate and remove carbon dioxide from your blood. Both lung capacity and lung function are affected by the various stages of COPD.

There are four stages of COPD: mild, moderate, severe and very severe. Here is a breakdown of the different stages of COPD based on FEV1 score:

  • Mild COPD: 80 percent or higher
  • Moderate COPD: 50-70 percent
  • Severe COPD: 30 to 49 percent
  • Very Severe COPD: Less than 30 percent

Can I Improve my Lung Capacity?

Yes! Lung function cannot be improved; however, lung capacity may be improved. Remember to always follow the advice and guidance of your doctor. Here are five easy steps for increasing lung capacity, adapted from a recent blog post that may help:

Take more Vitamin D. Some studies show that of those who increase their intake of Vitamin D in conjunction with standard rehabilitation, many show improvement in their ability to exercise and in respiratory strength. Vitamin D helps reduce inflammation, which is a key issue for people with COPD.

Increase your Self-Confidence. Several people with COPD participated in an exercise study, which found that those who underwent a confidence boosting program before starting the exercise routine experienced better results. Exercise is essential for people, and taking that one step further, having self-confidence improves your ability to exercise.

Keep a Clean Home. Dust and other allergens can cause more frequent flare-ups. Support your lungs by keeping your home as clean as possible. Consider removing items that collect dust from your home, such as curtains and tablecloths. Wash your sheets at high temperatures, and dust and vacuum regularly. Indoor air purifiers are another great way to improve the quality of air inside of your home.

Lung Capacity: What Does It Mean?

Exercise more. Each time you exercise, you improve your exercise tolerance level. Start slow, and be sure to check with your primary care physician before starting a new exercise regime. Simply walking in place while watching TV or walking around the block is a great place to start.

Practice breathing exercises. Breathing exercises are a great way to help your lungs. Start in a relaxed posture, so you’re able to breathe in and out more easily. Read Best Breathing Exercises for COPD for some great breathing techniques to try out.

 

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life. 

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Lung Infection and COPD: Signs and Symptoms

Lung Infection and COPD: Signs and Symptoms

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive form of lung disease ranging from mild to severe. It is characterized by the obstruction of airflow into and out of the lungs, making breathing difficult. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis both fall under the category of COPD. Lung infection and COPD go hand in hand. A person with COPD has narrowed airways and inflamed air sacs, making him or her more prone to lung infections, which are sometimes referred to as pneumonia. Here are the facts you need to know about lung infection and COPD.

What is a Lung Infection?

Pneumonia, or a lung infection, occurs when bacteria, viruses and sometimes fungi collect in a person’s lungs and begin to grow. This causes the air sacs in the lungs to become filled with pus and liquid, making it more difficult for a person to breathe. Symptoms include chest pain and/or a frequent cough that’s different from the usual chronic cough that’s associated with COPD.

Pneumonia and COPD is a serious combination that should not be taken lightly. Damage from pneumonia can cause irreversible damage to lung tissue, with the most severe complication being respiratory failure. In fact, acute respiratory failure is one of the leading health concerns when a person with COPD develops pneumonia.

Can Lung Infections be Prevented?

Lung infection and COPD, while common, isn’t entirely unavoidable. However, there are steps you can take to protect yourself and your lungs. Many people develop pneumonia after having the flu. Because of this, getting a flu shot is an important safety precaution that a person can take to reduce chances of contracting pneumonia. Frequent hand washing is also key, as is staying away from people who are sick.

Eating healthy and exercising are also great ways to strengthen your immune system, which will not only reduce your chances of getting sick, but also lower the risk of experiencing COPD exacerbations.

Signs and Symptoms of a Lung Infection

Lung Infection and COPD: What You Can Do

Symptoms of a lung infection are very similar to COPD symptoms, which can make it difficult to diagnose. Because of this, it’s important to be aware of the symptoms of a lung infection and how they differ from those of COPD.

1) Fever

Normal body temperature is typically around 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit, but varies from person to person. An elevated body temperature, or fever, might be an indication of a lung infection. In addition to an elevated body temperature, or a temperature over 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit, chills and shaking are other symptoms of a fever.

2) Increased Shortness of Breath

Experiencing shortness of breath is a common problem for people with COPD. However, if the shortness of breath gets worse, it could be a sign of a lung infection. Additionally, rapid breathing and an increased heart rate may also be signs of a lung infection. Because of this, paying careful attention to your body and the severity of your symptoms is imperative in helping to catch a lung infection early on.

3) Changes in Mucus

If you notice that you are expelling more mucus when you cough, or that it has changed, these could be symptoms of a lung infection. When a person has a lung infection, their mucus tends to change color, have a thicker and stickier consistency, and sometimes will have a foul odor. Your mucus can tell you a lot about the state of your lungs.

4) Sharp Chest Pain

People with a lung infection typically experience a sharp, aching pain on one side of their chest that worsens when they breathe in deeply. This is called pleuritic chest pain. It can also feel like a tightness or pressure inside of your chest wall. While pleuritic chest pain isn’t always indicative of a lung infection, it could signify another issue. Sometimes pleuritic chest pain could be a problem with the lung or heart. With any type of chest pain, it is important to immediately seek professional medical attention.

Managing a lung infection and COPD isn’t an easy task. However, knowing what to look out for can help you catch an infection before it gets worse. If you think you might have symptoms of a lung infection, contact your primary care physician for an expert opinion. It’s always better to err on the side of caution when it comes to your health.

Many people with COPD have experienced a reduction in inflammation and other COPD symptoms after receiving cellular therapy. Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

 

 

 

 

 

at the Lung Health Institute. If you’re interested in learning more about how cellular therapy might help you, contact us today for more information.

Stage 3 COPD: Severe Stage COPD and You

Stage 3 COPD: Severe Stage COPD and You

As you know, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects everyone differently and at varying rates of progression. Stage 1 COPD or mild stage COPD is categorized by a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of about 80 percent or more of normal lung capacity based on the GOLD System, and stage 2 COPD is categorized with a FEV1 between 50 and 80 percent of normal lung capacity. In fact, there are four total COPD stages. After learning about COPD prognosis and life expectancy, stage 1 and stage 2 COPD, it’s time to take a closer look at stage 3 COPD.

Determining Stage 3 COPD

The COPD stages range from mild to very severe. At this point, you’ve probably had lung function testing, such as pulmonary function tests, spirometry and exercise tolerance testing. Your doctor will perform these types of tests, take a detailed medical history and take into account how COPD affects your life. If you’re in stage 3 COPD, you’re likely experiencing significant symptoms and changes in your pulmonary health and overall condition.

Determining stage 3 COPD is similar to determining stage 1 and stage 2 COPD. Your doctor may use the GOLD System and the BODE Index to categorize your stage of COPD.

In the GOLD System, stage 3 COPD is categorized as severe COPD with a FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in one second) between 30 and 50 percent of normal lung capacity.

Stage 3 COPD

During stage 3 COPD, you will likely experience significant lung function impairment. Many patients will experience an increase in COPD flare-ups or exacerbations. For some people, the increase in flare-ups means they could need to be hospitalized at times as well.

Increased breathlessness and more fatigue make it difficult to perform daily tasks, enjoy your favorite activities and to exercise. Simply put, people in stage 3 COPD become exhausted more easily. Because COPD is a progressive disease, it will continue to worsen over time. At this stage of COPD, many people see their doctors regularly.

Stage 3 COPD Treatment Options

Stage 3 COPD: Severe Stage COPD and You

As your COPD progresses, you’ll likely need to have more pulmonary function tests. Your doctor will use your lung function tests to help keep track of how your lungs are doing and how well your COPD treatments are working. Many doctors compare old pulmonary function tests with more recent ones. Your doctor will also keep track of your overall health. While there isn’t a cure for COPD, treatment options are available.

You and your doctor will continue to work together to manage and reduce your COPD symptoms, prevent flare-ups and modify your treatment plan as needed. The COPD treatments you used in stage 1 COPD or stage 2 COPD might need to be changed when you’re in stage 3 COPD.

Your doctor may prescribe medications, such as combination inhalers, short and long-acting bronchodilators, oxygen therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation.

In addition to these medications and therapies, your doctor will likely recommend staying up-to-date on your flu and pneumonia vaccines to help prevent COPD flare-ups. People with COPD are at a greater risk for catching possibly life-threatening colds, flus, viruses and infections, so prevention is key.

In the event of a flare-up, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics, corticosteroids and even hospitalization. It’s important to see your doctor regularly even if you’re feeling well. However, it’s highly important to report any changes in your lung health, breathing, COPD symptoms or overall health to your doctor immediately.

Stage 3 COPD Lifestyle Modifications

In any stage of COPD, there are lifestyle modifications that can help reduce your COPD flare-up risk, manage your symptoms and even improve your quality of life. One of the most important changes you can make is to quit smoking. In addition to quitting smoking, avoiding your triggers, getting plenty of exercise and eating a healthy diet help people live a more active life.

Alternative therapies also have the potential to improve quality of life. For example, people who had cellular therapy reported feeling better, doing more of their favorite activities and experienced improvements in lung function. In fact, many patients were able to reduce their oxygen therapy use after treatment.

While medications only work to manage and reduce COPD symptoms, cellular therapy may help to promote healing from within the lungs, potentially improving breathing and quality of life. Cellular therapy can help people in any stage of COPD, including stage 3 COPD.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

6 Minute Walk Test for COPD

6 Minute Walk Test for COPD

For people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), undergoing lung function testing, such as pulmonary function tests, is a typical occurrence. Part of your treatment plan may include pulmonary rehabilitation—a program that combines exercise, education and support to help people learn to breathe and function at the highest level possible. During pulmonary rehabilitation, a 6-minute walk test is typically performed at the start of the program or to evaluate a person for lung surgery. Here’s what you need to know about the 6-minute walk test for COPD.

What is a 6-Minute Walk Test for COPD?

The 6-minute walk test measures the distance someone can walk quickly on a flat, hard surface in 6 minutes. The test reflects the person’s ability to perform daily physical activities. Because COPD affects everyone differently, lung function and exercise tolerance testing help doctors and patients work together to develop the best treatment plan.

The 6-minute walk test was developed as a valid alternative to standard treadmill-based exercise testing for people who are elderly or who cannot perform treadmill-based exercise testing. You may have another 6-minute walk test after a certain amount of time has passed to test how much you have improved, as well.

Who Needs a 6-Minute Walk Test?

One of the most important reasons to have a 6-minute walk test is to measure the response to medical intervention in a person with moderate to severe heart or lung disease, such as COPD.

Your doctor may also use a 6-minute walk test to provide valuable information about your ability to perform daily activities, to evaluate how your body responds to exercise and as a measurement of functional status.

Some people may not be candidates for the 6-minute walk test. Talk with your doctor before having a 6-minute walk test if you have any of the following:

  • Unstable angina (during the month prior to the test)
  • Heart attack (the month prior to the test)
  • Resting heart rate of more than 120 beats per minute
  • Systolic blood pressure of more than 188mm Hg
  • Diastolic blood pressure of more than 100mm Hg

You and your doctor can discuss your exercise testing, lung function testing and treatment needs in more detail and decide what procedures are right for you.

Preparing for Your 6-Minute Walk Test for COPD

6-Minute Walk Test for COPD

There are a few simple tips to help you prepare for your 6-minute walk test for COPD. On the day of your test, remember to follow your doctor’s specific instructions and to do the following:

  • Wear comfortable clothing
  • Wear comfortable shoes designed for walking, like sneakers or tennis shoes
  • Use walking aids if you normally need them, such as a cane or walker
  • Eat a light meal before early morning or afternoon tests
  • Avoid vigorous exercise within 2 hours prior to the test

Your 6-minute walk test technician will explain what will happen during the test, what you need to do and how to report your symptoms. Tell your technician immediately if you begin to experience chest pain, intolerable shortness of breath (dyspnea), leg cramps, staggering or excessive sweating. If your technician notices you have become pale or ashen in appearance, the technician should stop the test at once.

Helpful Tips for Your 6-Minute Walk Test for COPD

To make your 6-minute walk test experience easier, here are some helpful tips to keep in mind:

  • You are permitted to slow down, stop and rest as needed.
  • You may lean against a wall when resting, but you must remain standing.
  • If you do stop to rest, remember that the timer will not stop when you do. You need to start walking again as soon as you’re ready.
  • Your technician will watch carefully as you walk and announce your elapsed time every minute.
  • You can bring up questions or concerns with your technician at any time.

6-Minute Walk Test for COPD Test Results

Most 6-minute walk tests are performed twice. Your first test occurs prior to receiving therapeutic interventions, and the second afterward. Performing the test twice helps your doctor determine if you have experienced significant improvement in functional status, such as in your ability to perform daily tasks.

One of the goals of receiving medical treatment for COPD is to be able to walk farther during the second test. In fact, there are studies showing that people who underwent exercise, diaphragmatic strength training and other medical treatments actually increased the distance they walked during the second test. While the 6-minute walk test is a useful tool, the test should only be performed under medical supervision at a medical facility.

What’s Next?

6-Minute Walk Test for COPD

Along with lung function testing and exercise testing, such as the 6-minute walk test for COPD, you and your doctor will work together to develop the best COPD treatment plan for you. This plan could include medications, inhalers, supplements, oxygen therapy, exercise, diet and alternative therapies, like cellular therapy.

Cellular therapy promotes healing from within the lungs. In fact, many people with COPD, who had trouble performing daily tasks, found that they improved after receiving cellular therapy. Now, these patients are able to climb a flight of stairs, cook a meal, do household chores and even exercise with more ease.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.