Incentive Spirometry Benefits

Incentive Spirometry Benefits

People living with chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis, experience similar lung disease symptoms. Shortness of breath and decreased lung function make breathing difficult. Sometimes, doctors recommend their patients use an incentive spirometer. Incentive spirometers are prescribed after surgery or as part of a lung disease treatment plan. Here are the facts you need to know about incentive spirometry benefits.

What Do Incentive Spirometers Do?

Incentive spirometers gently exercise the lungs and aid in keeping the lungs as healthy as possible. The device helps retrain your lungs how to take slow and deep breaths. An incentive spirometer helps increase lung capacity and improves patients’ ability to breathe.

Tying to manage medications, doctors’ instructions and your lung disease symptoms can feel overwhelming and like you have no control over your healthcare. Using an incentive spirometer lets you take charge of your lung health. When you use your incentive spirometer as instructed by your doctor, you actively help your lungs learn how to work better.

How Do You Use an Incentive Spirometer?

Incentive Spirometry Benefits

There different types of incentive spirometers. Because of the variety of incentive spirometers available, follow the instructions for your specific type of spirometer. Ask your doctor or respiratory therapist to teach you how to use your device. Any type of spirometer will help you and your lungs. Always follow your doctor’s instructions.

What are the Incentive Spirometry Benefits?

Incentive Spirometry Benefits

There are several incentive spirometry benefits. Using your incentive spirometer exercises your lungs, measures how well your lungs fill with air and helps keep your tiny air sacs (alveoli) inflated.

Keeping your alveoli inflated and working properly helps your lungs exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide more effectively.

Experiencing the incentive spirometry benefits is easy when you use your device as directed. At first, you may not reach your incentive spirometry goals. Don’t let that discourage you from using your device.

Remember, it takes time to retrain your lungs. Keep using your incentive spirometer to get the most out of the incentive spirometry benefits.

Some people like to track their progress in their treatment journal. Write down your incentive spirometry measurements daily. This will help you monitor your progress, so you can celebrate your improving lung health successes.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

 

Stage 4 COPD: End-Stage COPD and You

Stage 4 COPD: End-Stage COPD and You

As you know, there are four total stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), ranging from mild to very severe. Stage 1 COPD is also known as mild COPD, and stage 2 COPD is the moderate stage at which recognizable symptoms often first appear. As COPD progresses, your COPD stage will also change to reflect the severity of your symptoms. Severe stage COPD, or stage 3 COPD, causes significant changes in symptoms, lung health and overall health. The final stage of COPD is also known as stage 4, or very severe. Here’s everything you need to know about stage 4 COPD or end-stage COPD.

Determining Stage 4 COPD

As in previous stages of COPD, your doctor will likely use the GOLD System and the BODE Index to identify stage 4 COPD. By this stage, you’ve likely had multiple lung function tests and exercise tolerance tests, such as pulmonary function tests and 6-minute walk tests. Seeing your doctor regularly is important during any stage of COPD, but it’s especially important during stage 4.

In the GOLD System, stage 4 COPD is categorized as end-stage COPD with a lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) than stage 3, or those with a stage 3 FEV1 and low blood oxygen levels.

Stage 4 COPD

During stage 4 COPD, many people have significant airflow limitations, which often drastically affect their lives. In fact, simple tasks, such as taking a shower, making the bed or cooking a small meal, leave them feeling exhausted and completely out of breath. While lung function can vary, typically during stage 4, lung function drops to 30 percent or less.

Your doctor will closely monitor your pulmonary health and overall health. Because COPD flare-ups worsen symptoms and can be life-threatening, your doctor will work with you to manage and prevent them.

If you experience low blood oxygen levels, your organs, cells and tissues are unable to receive enough oxygen. Oxygen is essential to a properly functioning body, but many people with COPD have difficulty getting adequate oxygen. Your doctor may prescribe oxygen therapy to help you receive more oxygen.

For some people, other conditions that can occur along with COPD may worsen as well, such a heart failure. If you notice a change in your symptoms or feel ill, your doctor will likely want to make sure you’re not having a COPD flare-up.

Stage 4 COPD Treatments

Stage 4 COPD: End-Stage COPD and You

COPD is a progressive disease, and there’s no cure. However, you and your doctor will work together to develop or modify your treatment plan to best fit your needs. There are many different treatment options, such as medications, lifestyle changes and alternative therapies.

For the management of stable stage 4 COPD, your doctor may prescribe inhalers, corticosteroids to help you breathe better. For example, your doctor may prescribe inhalers called bronchodilators, which help relax and open your airways. Your doctor may also prescribe steroids to reduce inflammation and prevent flare-ups.

Sometimes you may need a type of inhaler called a combination inhaler. Combination medications combine two types of medicine in the same drug, such as a bronchodilator and a steroid in the same inhaler.

In the event of a COPD flare-up, your doctor could prescribe antibiotics, oral steroids or even hospitalization. Remember to report any changes in your symptoms or overall health to your doctor. It’s also important to stay up to date on your flu and pneumonia vaccinations to reduce and prevent flare-ups from happening.

For many people, alternative treatment, such as cellular therapy has helped them get back to their favorite activities. In fact, some people have reported reducing their oxygen therapy use after treatment, feeling better and breathing easier. Cellular therapy works differently than traditional medications. While traditional medications can help manage COPD symptoms, cellular therapy may help to promote healing from within the lungs, potentially addressing disease progression.

Stage 4 COPD Lifestyle Changes

Your doctor may also recommend certain lifestyle changes. One of the most important lifestyle changes you can make is to quit smoking. Smoke is a lung irritant and trigger for COPD symptoms. While quitting smoking and remaining smoke-free is challenging, there are smoking cessation tips, treatments and groups to help you succeed.

Eating a healthy diet and getting plenty of exercise have been proven to help people with COPD enjoy a better quality of life. Too much salt can worsen COPD and heart problems, so try seasoning your food with herbs instead. Gentle exercises like yoga, walking and Tai Chi are excellent options for people in any stage of COPD with limited mobility.

Combining lifestyle changes, medications and alternative therapies, like cellular therapy, can help you live a more active life. COPD prognosis and life expectancy vary; however, from stage 1 COPD to stage 4 COPD, these treatment options are available.

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality of life. 

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

People living with emphysema often cope with difficult emphysema symptoms. These symptoms include shortness of breath, fatigue and coughing among others. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis fall under the larger disease category of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Emphysema, chronic bronchitis and COPD affect people differently. For some people emphysema progresses quickly, and for others, it progresses slowly. Because emphysema affects people differently, it is often hard for people to know their exact emphysema prognosis. Here is the information you need to know about emphysema prognosis and treatment options.

What is Emphysema?

Emphysema damages the lungs’ tiny air sacs (alveoli). The alveoli bring oxygen to the bloodstream. However, in emphysema, holes form in the inner walls of the alveoli. As emphysema progresses, the airways leading to the alveoli lose their elasticity. Eventually, the weakened air sacs collapse and trap oxygen in the lungs.

COPD, which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis, makes it difficult for people to exhale old air fully. When people with emphysema take a breath, the old air cannot get out completely, so new air cannot get inside. People with emphysema struggle to breathe and often have trouble receiving enough oxygen.

Your emphysema prognosis depends on how advanced your emphysema is and the severity of your emphysema symptoms.

Emphysema Causes

In fact, emphysema can result from a variety of causes. The most common causes include:

  • Genetics
  • Cigarette Smoking
  • Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency
  • Long-term Exposure to Environmental Air Pollutants

Emphysema Prognosis

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

Currently, there is no cure for emphysema, chronic bronchitis, COPD or other chronic lung diseases. To diagnose and better understand the severity of your emphysema, your doctor may take a detailed medical history, run tests and recommend certain procedures.

For example, many doctors perform pulmonary function tests (PFTs) to help them diagnose the condition, understand the severity and what treatments could work best. PFTs measure how well your lungs and current treatment plan are working.

Your doctor may also perform a 6-minute walk test to assess your exercise tolerance. In addition, chest x-rays, blood tests and CT scans may be needed. After performing tests, your doctor may place your emphysema into stages. The emphysema stages help you and your doctor better understand the severity of your symptoms and your emphysema prognosis.

Emphysema Stages

The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) created the GOLD System to place certain chronic lung diseases into stages. The GOLD System uses the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) measurement from a PFT to categorize emphysema and COPD. In the GOLD System, the emphysema stages are as follows:

  • Very mild or Stage 1: Very mild emphysema with a FEV1 about 80 percent or more of normal.
  • Moderate or Stage 2: Moderate emphysema with a FEV1 between 50 and 80 percent of normal.
  • Severe or Stage 3: Severe emphysema with FEV1 between 30 and 50 percent of normal.
  • Very severe or Stage 4: Very severe emphysema with a lower FEV1 than Stage 3, or those with Stage 3 FEV1 and low blood oxygen levels.

While these stages are helpful, nobody can accurately predict emphysema prognosis or emphysema life expectancy. However, doctors can use tests and procedures to estimate emphysema prognosis and life expectancy.

Hearing that there isn’t a cure may sound like a bleak emphysema prognosis, but there are treatment options available to manage emphysema symptoms.

Emphysema Treatment Options

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

Emphysema treatment options work to manage symptoms, so people can breathe better. Traditional treatments include bronchodilator inhalers, corticosteroids, combination inhalers, antibiotics and oxygen therapy.

Bronchodilators help open the airways and relax the muscles around the airways. Corticosteroids help reduce inflammation. Combination inhalers typically combine a bronchodilator and an inhaled corticosteroid into the same inhaler.

For an infection, antibiotics may be prescribed. Often, people with emphysema have trouble getting enough oxygen and experience low blood oxygen levels. Sometimes, oxygen therapy is used to help people maintain a better blood oxygen level.

Emphysema causes many people to feel short of breath, especially during activity. It’s normal to avoid doing activities that make you feel breathless. However, it’s been shown that even gentle exercises like walking strengthen muscles and improve stamina. Ask your doctor about what amount and type of exercise is best for you.

Diet can affect emphysema as well. Avoid foods that cause excess gas and bloating, such as fried foods, broccoli, cabbage and carbonated beverages. Try baked foods, steamed vegetables, fruit smoothies and water instead. Check out these COPDfriendly foods for more ideas, and remember to talk with your doctor before changing your diet.

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

 

 

 

Stage 3 COPD: Severe Stage COPD and You

Stage 3 COPD: Severe Stage COPD and You

As you know, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects everyone differently and at varying rates of progression. Stage 1 COPD or mild stage COPD is categorized by a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of about 80 percent or more of normal lung capacity based on the GOLD System, and stage 2 COPD is categorized with a FEV1 between 50 and 80 percent of normal lung capacity. In fact, there are four total COPD stages. After learning about COPD prognosis and life expectancy, stage 1 and stage 2 COPD, it’s time to take a closer look at stage 3 COPD.

Determining Stage 3 COPD

The COPD stages range from mild to very severe. At this point, you’ve probably had lung function testing, such as pulmonary function tests, spirometry and exercise tolerance testing. Your doctor will perform these types of tests, take a detailed medical history and take into account how COPD affects your life. If you’re in stage 3 COPD, you’re likely experiencing significant symptoms and changes in your pulmonary health and overall condition.

Determining stage 3 COPD is similar to determining stage 1 and stage 2 COPD. Your doctor may use the GOLD System and the BODE Index to categorize your stage of COPD.

In the GOLD System, stage 3 COPD is categorized as severe COPD with a FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in one second) between 30 and 50 percent of normal lung capacity.

Stage 3 COPD

During stage 3 COPD, you will likely experience significant lung function impairment. Many patients will experience an increase in COPD flare-ups or exacerbations. For some people, the increase in flare-ups means they could need to be hospitalized at times as well.

Increased breathlessness and more fatigue make it difficult to perform daily tasks, enjoy your favorite activities and to exercise. Simply put, people in stage 3 COPD become exhausted more easily. Because COPD is a progressive disease, it will continue to worsen over time. At this stage of COPD, many people see their doctors regularly.

Stage 3 COPD Treatment Options

Stage 3 COPD: Severe Stage COPD and You

As your COPD progresses, you’ll likely need to have more pulmonary function tests. Your doctor will use your lung function tests to help keep track of how your lungs are doing and how well your COPD treatments are working. Many doctors compare old pulmonary function tests with more recent ones. Your doctor will also keep track of your overall health. While there isn’t a cure for COPD, treatment options are available.

You and your doctor will continue to work together to manage and reduce your COPD symptoms, prevent flare-ups and modify your treatment plan as needed. The COPD treatments you used in stage 1 COPD or stage 2 COPD might need to be changed when you’re in stage 3 COPD.

Your doctor may prescribe medications, such as combination inhalers, short and long-acting bronchodilators, oxygen therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation.

In addition to these medications and therapies, your doctor will likely recommend staying up-to-date on your flu and pneumonia vaccines to help prevent COPD flare-ups. People with COPD are at a greater risk for catching possibly life-threatening colds, flus, viruses and infections, so prevention is key.

In the event of a flare-up, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics, corticosteroids and even hospitalization. It’s important to see your doctor regularly even if you’re feeling well. However, it’s highly important to report any changes in your lung health, breathing, COPD symptoms or overall health to your doctor immediately.

Stage 3 COPD Lifestyle Modifications

In any stage of COPD, there are lifestyle modifications that can help reduce your COPD flare-up risk, manage your symptoms and even improve your quality of life. One of the most important changes you can make is to quit smoking. In addition to quitting smoking, avoiding your triggers, getting plenty of exercise and eating a healthy diet help people live a more active life.

Alternative therapies also have the potential to improve quality of life. For example, people who had cellular therapy reported feeling better, doing more of their favorite activities and experienced improvements in lung function. In fact, many patients were able to reduce their oxygen therapy use after treatment.

While medications only work to manage and reduce COPD symptoms, cellular therapy may help to promote healing from within the lungs, potentially improving breathing and quality of life. Cellular therapy can help people in any stage of COPD, including stage 3 COPD.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

What Is the Life Expectancy for Bronchiectasis?

What Is the Life Expectancy for Bronchiectasis?

For somebody with bronchiectasis, life expectancy can be a significant concern. In the same class as COPD and emphysema, bronchiectasis is a chronic obstructive lung condition that leads to pulmonary inflammation and infection. Over time, the walls of the bronchi thicken and mucus builds up, scarring and damaging the lungs. One of the most frustrating parts of bronchiectasis is the periodic flare-ups, which can make it difficult to breathe — and will get worse over time.
There are two types of bronchiectasis — congenital and acquired (non-congenital) — and prognosis depends largely on which type you have. Congenital forms such as those caused by cystic fibrosis may have poorer outcomes than acquired types, which are often caused by damage to the airway or repeated lung infections rather than smoking or inhaling contaminants.
Bronchiectasis itself does not shorten your lifespan, but certain symptoms and complications may arise that could decrease life expectancy in those with the disease. However, it is important to see your doctor for an exam and consultation to talk about your specific situation and contributing factors.

What complications may arise from bronchiectasis?

Complications of bronchiectasis include:
Pneumonia. Due to the buildup of mucus in the lungs, some patients may have bouts of pneumonia. Pneumonia has many possible causes, but most often it is a complication of the flu. There were 43,000 deaths from pneumonia in 2019, so it’s important to stay on top of your health when living with bronchiectasis. During cold and flu season, wash your hands frequently, avoid crowded places and wear a mask if necessary.
Massive hemoptysis. This can happen if a blood vessel supplying the lung splits open and causes bleeding; the blood is then coughed up. Symptoms include coughing up more than 100ml (about one-third of a soda can) of blood within a 24-hour period, breathing difficulties, lightheadedness, dizziness, or cold and clammy hands. If you suspect you might have massive hemoptysis, call 911.
Heart failure. A study showed that patients with bronchiectasis may be at a higher risk of heart disease and stroke than the general population.
Respiratory failure. Because of the damage caused to the lungs over time and the higher chance of infection, patients with bronchiectasis may eventually go into respiratory failure. This is one of the more common causes of death for those with bronchiectasis.

Cellular therapy treats bronchiectasis at the source

While certain medications and treatments can address the symptoms of bronchiectasis, cellular therapy is a type of regenerative treatment that can treat chronic lung disorders like bronchiectasis by targeting the actual source of the condition — the lungs.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

 

COPD Stages, Prognosis and Life Expectancy: Here Are Your Numbers

COPD Stages, Prognosis and Life Expectancy: Here Are Your Numbers

With all of the numbers, facts and information you have to remember about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), you may have many questions. One common question is, “how long can I live with COPD?” It’s an important one to ask, but many people understandably feel too worried or afraid to ask it. Because COPD and other chronic, progressive lung diseases affect everyone differently, there’s no way to accurately predict the life expectancy of people with COPD. However, researchers and doctors have come up with ways to estimate and measure life expectancy and prognosis by placing COPD into stages. The COPD stages, prognosis and life expectancy all work together to help doctors develop a COPD treatment plan for their patients. Here’s what you need to know about COPD stages, prognosis and life expectancy.

How are COPD Stages, Prognosis and Life Expectancy Determined?

Because COPD affects everyone differently and can range from mild to severe, your COPD stages, lung prognosis and life expectancy depend on many varying factors. COPD is a progressive condition, meaning it will worsen over time. Including emphysema and chronic bronchitis, COPD, the third leading cause of death in the United States, is a major obstructive lung disease that currently affects over 16 million people in the U.S. However, it’s estimated that 24 million may have COPD without even knowing it.

Your doctor is likely going to recommend that you have a pulmonary function test (PFT) to determine how well your lungs are working and how well your COPD treatment plan is working. With the pulmonary function test results, your doctor may use that information to aid in determining what stage your COPD is in. In combination with pulmonary function tests, the two most commonly used methods to measure the severity of COPD is through the GOLD System and the BODE Index.

Gold System and COPD Stages

One way to measure prognosis and life expectancy is through the GOLD System of staging, which places COPD into stages based on severity. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) came up with the GOLD System. GOLD uses the forced expiratory volume (FEV1) test from your pulmonary function test to categorize the severity of COPD into stages. The forced expiratory volume (FEV1) shows the amount of air a person can forcefully exhale in one second. COPD has four total stages, and your airflow becomes more limited with each stage.

Here are your numbers and how the GOLD System breaks down the COPD Stages:

  • Stage 1: Very mild COPD with a FEV1 about 80 percent or more of normal.
  • Stage 2: Moderate COPD with a FEV1 between 50 and 80 percent of normal.
  • Stage 3: Severe emphysema with FEV1 between 30 and 50 percent of normal.
  • Stage 4: Very severe COPD with a lower FEV1 than Stage 3, or those with Stage 3 FEV1 and low blood oxygen levels

COPD Stages, Prognosis and Life Expectancy: Here Are Your Numbers

Simply put, as the COPD Stage numbers increase, the lung prognosis and life expectancy with COPD worsens.

BODE Index for COPD

Other scientists came up with the BODE Index to measure the severity of COPD. BODE stands for body mass, airflow obstruction, dyspnea and exercise capacity. The BODE Index accounts for how COPD affects your life.

  • Body Mass
  • Airflow Obstruction
  • Dyspnea
  • Exercise Capacity

The body mass index (BMI) helps determine if you’re overweight, obese or underweight. Airflow obstruction refers to your FEV1, which is similar to the GOLD system. Dyspnea means trouble breathing, and exercise capacity refers to exercise tolerance. Many people with COPD take a six-minute walk test—the distance you can walk in 6 minutes—to evaluate their level of exercise tolerance. These combined measurements make up the BODE Index and can be used to put COPD into stages or approximate life expectancy with COPD.

What do the numbers mean in COPD Stages, Prognosis and Life Expectancy?

Unfortunately, COPD worsens over time, and there is no known cure. However, there are treatment options available to help people breathe easier. Medications, oxygen therapy, diet, exercise, natural supplements and cellular therapy are all COPD treatment options. In fact, many of our patients have seen improved pulmonary function, better quality of life and have reduced dependency on inhalers, nebulizers, and oxygen therapy.

If you or someone you love has COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.