Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

People living with emphysema often cope with difficult emphysema symptoms. These symptoms include shortness of breath, fatigue and coughing among others. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis fall under the larger disease category of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Emphysema, chronic bronchitis and COPD affect people differently. For some people emphysema progresses quickly, and for others, it progresses slowly. Because emphysema affects people differently, it is often hard for people to know their exact emphysema prognosis. Here is the information you need to know about emphysema prognosis and treatment options.

What is Emphysema?

Emphysema damages the lungs’ tiny air sacs (alveoli). The alveoli bring oxygen to the bloodstream. However, in emphysema, holes form in the inner walls of the alveoli. As emphysema progresses, the airways leading to the alveoli lose their elasticity. Eventually, the weakened air sacs collapse and trap oxygen in the lungs.

COPD, which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis, makes it difficult for people to exhale old air fully. When people with emphysema take a breath, the old air cannot get out completely, so new air cannot get inside. People with emphysema struggle to breathe and often have trouble receiving enough oxygen.

Your emphysema prognosis depends on how advanced your emphysema is and the severity of your emphysema symptoms.

Emphysema Causes

In fact, emphysema can result from a variety of causes. The most common causes include:

  • Genetics
  • Cigarette Smoking
  • Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency
  • Long-term Exposure to Environmental Air Pollutants

Emphysema Prognosis

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

Currently, there is no cure for emphysema, chronic bronchitis, COPD or other chronic lung diseases. To diagnose and better understand the severity of your emphysema, your doctor may take a detailed medical history, run tests and recommend certain procedures.

For example, many doctors perform pulmonary function tests (PFTs) to help them diagnose the condition, understand the severity and what treatments could work best. PFTs measure how well your lungs and current treatment plan are working.

Your doctor may also perform a 6-minute walk test to assess your exercise tolerance. In addition, chest x-rays, blood tests and CT scans may be needed. After performing tests, your doctor may place your emphysema into stages. The emphysema stages help you and your doctor better understand the severity of your symptoms and your emphysema prognosis.

Emphysema Stages

The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) created the GOLD System to place certain chronic lung diseases into stages. The GOLD System uses the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) measurement from a PFT to categorize emphysema and COPD. In the GOLD System, the emphysema stages are as follows:

  • Very mild or Stage 1: Very mild emphysema with a FEV1 about 80 percent or more of normal.
  • Moderate or Stage 2: Moderate emphysema with a FEV1 between 50 and 80 percent of normal.
  • Severe or Stage 3: Severe emphysema with FEV1 between 30 and 50 percent of normal.
  • Very severe or Stage 4: Very severe emphysema with a lower FEV1 than Stage 3, or those with Stage 3 FEV1 and low blood oxygen levels.

While these stages are helpful, nobody can accurately predict emphysema prognosis or emphysema life expectancy. However, doctors can use tests and procedures to estimate emphysema prognosis and life expectancy.

Hearing that there isn’t a cure may sound like a bleak emphysema prognosis, but there are treatment options available to manage emphysema symptoms.

Emphysema Treatment Options

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

Emphysema treatment options work to manage symptoms, so people can breathe better. Traditional treatments include bronchodilator inhalers, corticosteroids, combination inhalers, antibiotics and oxygen therapy.

Bronchodilators help open the airways and relax the muscles around the airways. Corticosteroids help reduce inflammation. Combination inhalers typically combine a bronchodilator and an inhaled corticosteroid into the same inhaler.

For an infection, antibiotics may be prescribed. Often, people with emphysema have trouble getting enough oxygen and experience low blood oxygen levels. Sometimes, oxygen therapy is used to help people maintain a better blood oxygen level.

Emphysema causes many people to feel short of breath, especially during activity. It’s normal to avoid doing activities that make you feel breathless. However, it’s been shown that even gentle exercises like walking strengthen muscles and improve stamina. Ask your doctor about what amount and type of exercise is best for you.

Diet can affect emphysema as well. Avoid foods that cause excess gas and bloating, such as fried foods, broccoli, cabbage and carbonated beverages. Try baked foods, steamed vegetables, fruit smoothies and water instead. Check out these COPDfriendly foods for more ideas, and remember to talk with your doctor before changing your diet.

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

 

 

 

Liquid Oxygen: Weighing the Pros and Cons

Liquid Oxygen: Weighing the Pros and Cons

If you have a condition such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or pulmonary fibrosis, chances are that you might have a prescription for supplemental oxygen. Supplemental oxygen has shown to be beneficial for many people with chronic lung disease by improving exercise tolerance and breathlessness during exertion.

Liquid oxygen, also called LOX, is different from concentrated, or “regular” oxygen. Concentrated oxygen tanks can be bulky and difficult to carry around, which is why some people choose to use the smaller liquid oxygen tanks. Let’s take a deeper look into what liquid oxygen is, and also weigh the pros and cons.

What is Liquid Oxygen?

Concentrated oxygen is oxygen in gas form, whereas liquid oxygen is oxygen that has been compressed into liquid form. That’s the major difference between the two. There are other smaller differences, and the type of oxygen tank that you choose will depend upon your personal preferences.

Concentrated oxygen tanks are much larger than liquid oxygen tanks. This is because when oxygen converts from a liquid to gas, it expands 860 times! To convert oxygen from gas to liquid, it must be cooled by at least -297 degrees Fahrenheit, or -183 degrees centigrade.

Which is Better? Concentrated or Liquid Oxygen?

A study published in Thorax respiratory medicine journal took a look at liquid oxygen versus concentrated oxygen for portable use. Liquid oxygen came out slightly ahead.

The study reports: “The longer duration of liquid oxygen supply enables patients to spend more time using portable oxygen and going out of the house.”

Here’s a breakdown of the other findings from the study:

  • All patients’ arterial oxygen tension values when they were breathing liquid oxygen and gaseous oxygen were similar
  • There were no significant differences between distance walked in the baseline walk test and the walk with liquid or gaseous oxygen
  • The level of breathlessness also appeared to be similar for both types of oxygen after the two walking tests
  • The baseline walking distance was greater after the eight weeks spent using liquid oxygen than at the initial baseline walk
  • There was no significant difference in walking distance after eight weeks of gaseous oxygen
  • There were no significant changes in spirometric values or arterial blood gas tensions throughout the duration of the study
  • Patients using liquid oxygen left the house on average of 19.5 hours a week, while patients using gaseous oxygen only left the house an average of 15.5 hours a week
  • Of the 15 patients tested in the study, 11 preferred the liquid oxygen because it lasted longer and carrying and filling it were both easier

Pros of Using Liquid Oxygen

Liquid oxygen takes up less space than oxygen in its gas form, making it easier and lighter to carry around. Not only that, it also can be stored at a much lower pressure. This makes liquid oxygen tanks safer than concentrated oxygen cylinders, which are under high pressure.

Liquid oxygen portable tanks are filled from reservoirs that can be kept in the home. They are easier to fill than concentrated oxygen tanks. Additionally, liquid oxygen lasts longer than concentrated oxygen. In fact, a small amount of liquid oxygen can last a full day, making it a great choice to take with you when you leave the house.

Cons of Using Liquid Oxygen

You have to keep large containers filled with oxygen in your home to frequently fill the smaller, portable tank. This not only takes up space in your home; additionally, the recurring oxygen deliveries can get pricey. Another important thing to note is that liquid oxygen needs to be used within a week or two; otherwise, it will evaporate.

Liquid oxygen is often used for more hours a week than concentrated oxygen, meaning you will be wearing your oxygen more. Some users have reported that the process of using liquid oxygen equipment is confusing and difficult to remember.

Who Uses Liquid Oxygen?

Convenience and efficiency are the two major deciding factors when choosing between liquid or concentrated oxygen. Speak with your primary care physician about both options, and he or she will help you arrive at a decision that best suits your lifestyle.

Some Centers for Respiratory Health patients have been able to reduce their reliance upon supplemental oxygen after receiving cellular therapy.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

COPD Stages, Prognosis and Life Expectancy: Here Are Your Numbers

COPD Stages, Prognosis and Life Expectancy: Here Are Your Numbers

With all of the numbers, facts and information you have to remember about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), you may have many questions. One common question is, “how long can I live with COPD?” It’s an important one to ask, but many people understandably feel too worried or afraid to ask it. Because COPD and other chronic, progressive lung diseases affect everyone differently, there’s no way to accurately predict the life expectancy of people with COPD. However, researchers and doctors have come up with ways to estimate and measure life expectancy and prognosis by placing COPD into stages. The COPD stages, prognosis and life expectancy all work together to help doctors develop a COPD treatment plan for their patients. Here’s what you need to know about COPD stages, prognosis and life expectancy.

How are COPD Stages, Prognosis and Life Expectancy Determined?

Because COPD affects everyone differently and can range from mild to severe, your COPD stages, lung prognosis and life expectancy depend on many varying factors. COPD is a progressive condition, meaning it will worsen over time. Including emphysema and chronic bronchitis, COPD, the third leading cause of death in the United States, is a major obstructive lung disease that currently affects over 16 million people in the U.S. However, it’s estimated that 24 million may have COPD without even knowing it.

Your doctor is likely going to recommend that you have a pulmonary function test (PFT) to determine how well your lungs are working and how well your COPD treatment plan is working. With the pulmonary function test results, your doctor may use that information to aid in determining what stage your COPD is in. In combination with pulmonary function tests, the two most commonly used methods to measure the severity of COPD is through the GOLD System and the BODE Index.

Gold System and COPD Stages

One way to measure prognosis and life expectancy is through the GOLD System of staging, which places COPD into stages based on severity. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) came up with the GOLD System. GOLD uses the forced expiratory volume (FEV1) test from your pulmonary function test to categorize the severity of COPD into stages. The forced expiratory volume (FEV1) shows the amount of air a person can forcefully exhale in one second. COPD has four total stages, and your airflow becomes more limited with each stage.

Here are your numbers and how the GOLD System breaks down the COPD Stages:

  • Stage 1: Very mild COPD with a FEV1 about 80 percent or more of normal.
  • Stage 2: Moderate COPD with a FEV1 between 50 and 80 percent of normal.
  • Stage 3: Severe emphysema with FEV1 between 30 and 50 percent of normal.
  • Stage 4: Very severe COPD with a lower FEV1 than Stage 3, or those with Stage 3 FEV1 and low blood oxygen levels

COPD Stages, Prognosis and Life Expectancy: Here Are Your Numbers

Simply put, as the COPD Stage numbers increase, the lung prognosis and life expectancy with COPD worsens.

BODE Index for COPD

Other scientists came up with the BODE Index to measure the severity of COPD. BODE stands for body mass, airflow obstruction, dyspnea and exercise capacity. The BODE Index accounts for how COPD affects your life.

  • Body Mass
  • Airflow Obstruction
  • Dyspnea
  • Exercise Capacity

The body mass index (BMI) helps determine if you’re overweight, obese or underweight. Airflow obstruction refers to your FEV1, which is similar to the GOLD system. Dyspnea means trouble breathing, and exercise capacity refers to exercise tolerance. Many people with COPD take a six-minute walk test—the distance you can walk in 6 minutes—to evaluate their level of exercise tolerance. These combined measurements make up the BODE Index and can be used to put COPD into stages or approximate life expectancy with COPD.

What do the numbers mean in COPD Stages, Prognosis and Life Expectancy?

Unfortunately, COPD worsens over time, and there is no known cure. However, there are treatment options available to help people breathe easier. Medications, oxygen therapy, diet, exercise, natural supplements and cellular therapy are all COPD treatment options. In fact, many of our patients have seen improved pulmonary function, better quality of life and have reduced dependency on inhalers, nebulizers, and oxygen therapy.

If you or someone you love has COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

Emphysema Breathing Exercises

Emphysema Breathing Exercises

For people dealing with a chronic lung disease like emphysema, every breath doesn’t come easy. As the disease progresses over time, the amount of oxygen the lungs can absorb gets worse.

Luckily, it’s not all doom and gloom for emphysema sufferers as there are many ways to change one’s lifestyle to improve quality of life. Some of those ways include eating a lung-healthy diet, creating a lung-healthy home and performing emphysema breathing exercises. With your health in mind, Centers for Respiratory Health is here to offer some tips and information on emphysema breathing exercises.

What is Emphysema?

There are two types of chronic lung diseases, obstructive and restrictive. Emphysema is one of the most prevalent forms of obstructive lung disease. Emphysema is a lung disease which destroys the air sacs in the lung over time, making it difficult to breathe. As emphysema progresses, the inner walls of the air sacs form holes, weakening lung function and elasticity of the lungs’ walls. This limits the amount of oxygen entering the bloodstream.

Emphysema falls under the description of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). According to 2019 statistics provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a total of 4.6 percent of people in the United States have been diagnosed with COPD, emphysema, or chronic bronchitis.

Emphysema Breathing Exercises to Try

Emphysema Breathing Exercises

Before starting any emphysema breathing exercises or routines, consult your primary care physician or pulmonologist to see if you are able to do any of these exercises. Luckily, most of these exercises are not physically demanding and can be done at home.

Diaphragmatic Breathing

Diaphragm breathing is a great and easy technique for people looking for emphysema breathing exercises. This will help strengthen the diaphragm muscle to help people use less energy when breathing. Below is a step-by-step list of instructions on how to perform Diaphragmatic Breathing:

  • Lie on your back with your knees bent.
  • Keep one hand on the upper chest and the other resting on your abdomen.
  • Breathe in slowly through your nose and keep the one hand on your upper chest as still as possible.
  • Exhale slowly through the mouth while keeping the hand on your upper chest still.
  • Do this exercise between five and 10 minutes, up to three times a day.

The Huff-Cough Technique

Bouts of coughing are inevitable when dealing with a chronic lung disease. The Huff-Cough Technique is great for people looking to cough more effectively without getting fatigued; this is a great technique to try. Here’s how:

  • Sit in a chair – or upright – take several deep breaths similarly to diaphragmatic breathing.
  • Place one hand over your stomach and breathe normally.
  • Tighten up your stomach and chest muscles with your mouth open.
  • Force air out while whispering the word “huff.”

Pursed Lips Breathing

Pursed lips breathing is great for people looking to control their breath due to this exercise’s ability to help release trapped air from the lungs – a regular problem for those in later stages of emphysema. This technique also promotes relaxation and keeps the airways open for longer. Below are some step-by-step instructions:

  • Relax your neck and shoulders.
  • Inhale slowly through the nostrils for two seconds – with the mouth closed.
  • Exhale through the mouth for four seconds. When exhaling, pucker your lips like you’re giving a kiss.
  • Breathe out with a slow, steady pace.

Stop, Rest, Continue

When doing any physical or aerobic exercise, it’s important to keep an active pace without overdoing it. If you begin to feel short-of-breath during the exercise, that’s ok. Use these quick steps to get you back to a comfortable level:

  • Stop your activity.
  • Take a seat and relax the shoulders.
  • Breathe in through the nostrils for two seconds – with your mouth closed.
  • Exhale through your mouth for slowly for four seconds.
  • Repeat this process until breathing returns to normal levels.
  • Then continue with the physical exercise.

Emphysema Treatment Alternatives

Emphysema Breathing Exercises

Once emphysema breathing exercises are added to the daily routine and lung-healthy lifestyle, quality of life can improve. But for some people, more needs to be done. One alternative that may be effective is cellular therapy.

At Centers for Respiratory Health, we are an innovative leader of regenerative medicine dedicated to providing cellular therapies to help patients with chronic lung disorders and improve overall lung health. We offer an innovative wellness approach to your health and provide our patients with a potentially more effective way to improve overall lung health. Our goal is to improve our patients’ quality of life and help our patients Breathe Easier.

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

How to Clear the Lungs in 5 Easy Steps

How to Clear the Lungs in 5 Easy Steps

Sometimes it’s best to just get it all out.

When dealing with a progressive lung disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis or emphysema, the buildup of phlegm can be a constant source of frustration. Not only can this buildup cause difficulty in regular breathing, but the obstruction of the airways can be a source of aggravation, in the end causing more coughing. To avoid this, it’s important to clear the lungs as often as they become obstructed.

With your health in mind, the Centers for Respiratory Health is here to show you how to do just that. Here’s How to Clear the Lungs in 5 Easy Steps.

5. Drink Water

It may seem simple, but for 75% of Americans, chronic dehydration may be a constant issue. Your body needs water in order to function, but your throat in particular needs water to help clear mucus. By drinking two quarts of water a day, you can actively mitigate mucus build-up, allowing you to breathe better for longer periods of time. Aside from clearing out mucus, a glass of water a day has been found to improve moods, reduce headaches and improve energy levels. So for a healthier you, start your day with a glass of water.

4. Take an Expectorant or Mucolytic

An expectorant is a cough medication that works to loosen existing mucus within your lungs allowing your cough to be more productive. On the other hand, a mucolytic is a medicine that works to thin out mucus in the airways, making it easier to cough up. Although this can be ordered by your doctor, you may be able to find a generic of this drug (such as Robitussin) over the counter. However, before trying any new medication, always consult your doctor.

3. Cough correctly

Although the idea of a correct way of coughing may seem strange, it’s important to remember that proper breathing can often come down to the effect of posture on the diaphragm. When coughing, it is best to sit up straight, bend forward slightly and avoid sitting and laying down when coughing whenever possible. As an added tip, it is best to use the “Huff Cough” technique, which entails doing several mini-coughs rather than one big cough.

2. Use Natural Remedies

Traditional medicine may not be everyone’s preference. It can come with specific side-effects or simply feel unnatural. For those who like to avoid traditional medication whenever possible, a variety of natural foods and herbs can be used to promote airway clearance and mucus reduction. These roots include:

  • Garlic
  • Lemon
  • Ginseng
  • Eucalyptus peppermint
  • Licorice root
  • Pomegranate
  • Berries

So feel free to add these natural remedies to your diet after first consulting with your primary doctor or physician.

1. Use a Castor Oil Pack

Castor oil is a vegetable oil made from pressing the seeds of the castor oil plant. Available over the counter, castor oil is safe for consumption by the FDA and is known to help in a variety of health conditions. A castor oil pack—which can be made easily at home—works wonderfully in drawing toxins out of the body and has been appreciated as a general health tonic for centuries. When placed on the chest, similar to a vapor rub, castor oil is thought to break up congestion and toxins.

Although the habitual cleaning of one’s lungs is important to daily health and quality of life, if you’re looking to take a more proactive approach to your health, it may be time to consider our innovative cellular therapy. If you or a loved one suffers from a chronic lung disorders like COPD, emphysema, pneumoconiosis, or have other symptoms of lung disease, Centers for Respiratory Health may be able to help.

We offer an innovative wellness approach to your health and provide our patients with a potentially more effective way to improve overall lung health. You can continue to use your current pulmonary care and add our innovative treatment to potentially improve your overall lung health – focusing on helping you return to the activities you love with those you care about most.

It is time for you to take your life back from chronic lung disorders. Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers is standing by to answer all your questions. Contact us today by calling 866-638-4776 to learn more about our innovative cellular therapy.

 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

Recipes for Lung Detox

Recipes for Lung Detox

A Healthy Diet for Healthy Lungs

According to the American Lung Association, the average adult takes 20,000 breaths each day. If you have been diagnosed with a chronic lung disorder, these breaths will be harder for you, so it is particularly important to eat healthy foods and drink healthy liquids so that your body is nourished and has the energy to support your breathing. There are many foods that you can eat to support lung function and lung detox, and we have compiled some recipes for you to try. Since it can be difficult to cook and eat when you’re suffering from lung disorders, we chose foods that are easy to make and consume. Begin your road trip to wellness with these recipes for lung detox that promote healthy lung function:

Rosemary and Garlic Roasted Salmon

Rosemary and Garlic Roasted Salmon

Salmon is high in omega-3s. A study published in Chest reported that those who consumed omega-3s saw a significant drop in lung inflammation and improved results on the six-minute walking test.

Ingredients:

  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 fresh 6″ rosemary sprigs, about 1 tablespoon chopped
  • 1 1/2 to 2 pounds of salmon, preferably Copper River Salmon
  • 1/8 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 425°.
  • Peel and chop garlic and rosemary and set aside.
  • Place salmon on a parchment-lined baking sheet.
  • Sprinkle with salt, pepper, rosemary, and garlic. Place in the oven and roast for 12 minutes or until the salmon is flaky.

Lung Rejuvenator Juice

Lung Rejuvenator Juice

This healthy juice contains watercress, which helps soothe swollen breathing passages and lubricates the lungs. Turnips are high in vitamin A and lemons contain vitamin C, which are both full of antioxidants and both will help promote lung health. Garlic is a natural antibiotic, antiviral and antibacterial.

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch watercress
  • 1 cucumber
  • 1 turnip
  • 3 large carrots
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 lemon

Directions:

Place all the above ingredients in a juicer, blend it and serve! If you don’t have a juicer, you can put these items in a blender, then separate the juice and pulp using a strainer. Enjoy this once or twice a day. This healthy juice is best absorbed on an empty stomach. This recipe is for one serving.

Lung Stimulating Smoothie

Lung Stimulating Smoothie

This tasty smoothie contains lemons and oranges, both of which reduce the production of free radicals in the body. They can help reduce phlegm, making it easier to breathe. Pineapple reduces swelling, and pineapple juice has been known to help reduce coughing. Additionally, pineapple contains the enzyme bromelin which helps the lungs remove debris and detox naturally. Peppermint contains menthol, which soothes and relaxes the respiratory tract. The lung stimulating smoothie can be consumed multiple times each day to help reduce symptoms. This recipe makes just over two cups.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup fresh orange juice (2 large oranges)
  • 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice (from about 2 lemons)
  • 1 tbsp raw honey
  • 1 piece of ginger (peel removed) 2″ long up to 1″ thick
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 cup chopped pineapple (can be fresh or frozen)
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp peppermint oil (or 5 peppermint leaves)

Directions:

Combine all ingredients in a high-speed blender, blend then serve immediately. You also can store half the smoothie in the fridge for a snack later.

Love Your Lungs Juice

Love Your Lungs Juice

Cilantro helps the body remove heavy metals, which have been linked to lung disease. Carrots are a great source of vitamin A. Celery is full of organic sodium, which helps eliminate carbon dioxide from the body. Ginger helps remove air pollutants and other irritants from your lungs before they have time to irritate the lungs. It also reduces congestion and improves circulation.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pineapple center (contains the most bromelin)
  • 3 celery stalks (the greener the better)
  • 2 carrots
  • Small handful of cilantro
  • 1 inch ginger root (peeled)

Directions:

Place all the above ingredients in a juicer, blend it and serve! If you don’t have a juicer, you can put these items in a blender, then separate the juice and pulp using a strainer. Enjoy this once or twice a day. This healthy juice is best absorbed on an empty stomach. This recipe is for one serving.

While diet can certainly help improve lung function, many cases of debilitating lung disorders require additional treatment. If you or a loved one suffers from a chronic lung disorder, Centers for Respiratory Health may be able to help.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers is here to help ensure a smooth patient experience on your journey to BREATHE EASIER. Contact us today by calling 866-638-4776 to learn more about our innovative cellular therapy.

 

 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.