Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment

Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment

Living with ILD isn’t easy. It’s why we’re here to help.

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an umbrella term for a general type of lung disease that encompasses more than 100 different types of pulmonary conditions affecting oxygen absorption within the lungs. For those who suffer from the disease, it can present symptoms such as fatigue, dry cough, weight loss, acute pneumonia, cyanosis (bluish discoloration of the skin), and shortness of breath during rest or exertion.

Needless to say, the expression of these symptoms can be incredibly unpleasant for those with this form of chronic lung disease. And though there are forms of treatment available, it’s important to understand your disease and how to navigate it in order to keep yourself in the best health possible.

Thankfully, that’s where we come in.

With your health in mind, the Lung Health Institute is here to breakdown Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment in order to give you the information you need to improve your health one day at a time.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages

We’ll begin with the most important: ILD stages, because it has a direct effect on your potential life expectancy. In determining the progression and advancement of your interstitial lung disease, your physician or pulmonologist will typically go through two primary methods of judging your respiratory health: the GOLD System and the BODE Index. These two tests are designed to assess your pulmonary condition through a variety of different tests such as a spirometry assessment (or PFT), as well as several other metrics like a 6-minute walk test, oximeter results, and arterial blood-gas analysis.

This can sound like a lot, but trust us, the more information your doctor or pulmonologist can gather, the better. It’ll give them the maximum amount of information available in order to create the best treatment plan for your health.

The typical breakdown of ILD stages are as follows:

  • Mild- meaning you have 5+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Moderate- meaning you have 3-5+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Severe- meaning you have 3+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Advanced- meaning you have < 3 years with appropriate treatment

Although these are the general guidelines of ILD staging, as with any progressive lung disease, these life expectancies are largely dependent on the individual. This means that through proper treatment, diet and exercise, it’s possible to exceed these figures while maintaining a healthy quality of life.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Prognosis

In the treatment of any disease there’s initially a prognosis given. A prognosis, in short, is essentially an outlook on your disease’s eventual progression. It’s a directive on what the development of the disease will look like moving forward and how it will affect you.

In the case of ILD, the prognosis largely depends on the treatment regimen as well as cause of the disease’s development, but generally you can expect the following developments in your health:

  • Fatigue
  • Cyanosis
  • Weight loss
  • Acute pneumonia
  • Shortness of breath
  • Weight loss
  • Abnormal enlargement of the fingernail base
  • Dry, persistent cough
  • High blood pressure (in some cases)
  • Heart failure (in some cases)

With a clear understanding of what’s to come and a strong grasp of your disease, it’s time to talk about what you can do about it, and how a few changes to your lifestyle and treatment options can have a big effect on your overall health.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Treatment Options

In treating ILD you have a variety of medical treatment options ranging from inhalers, medication, cellular therapy and supplemental oxygen. And though these treatment options have shown efficacy in addressing the symptoms of lung disease—and in the case of cellular therapy, disease progression overall—there are a variety of things you can do today that can give your health and life expectancy a small boost.

To start:

  • Quit Smoking Not only can it actively take years off of your life, but it is likely to make your disease symptoms significantly worse. And trust, although the symptoms of ILD may not be bad enough for you to change now, by the time they progress to the point of being unbearable, it may be too late to go back.
  • Change Your Diet – It doesn’t have to be as extreme as never eating meat again and going vegetarian. Start with portions. Try to eat more grains (rice and pasta) than you eat meat. From there, drop the pasta and add in more vegetables. If you want to eat dessert, swap that out with some good and well-prepared fruit. Even strawberries with a little whipped or cream cheese would be a healthier pairing than a big German chocolate cake.
  • Get Out and Exercise We say this one a lot but it’s important to get your blood pumping and moving through your body easier. Why? Because your blood carries your oxygen to the parts of the body that need it. Even if it’s doing standing squats in front of the TV or walking to the mailbox, start small and build up from there. If you can keep yourself disciplined and consistent in your goals, you’ll be walking marathons in no time.

Moving Forward with Interstitial Lung Disease

A diagnosis of ILD is by no means the end. In fact, it’s just the beginning of your journey to better health and a better quality of life. And the first step is quitting smoking if you haven’t already. Even though we always recommend quitting smoking first as a crucial step to better health, the second is to address your general health through simple diet and exercise.

With these behavioral changes, it’s possible to greatly affect the pronouncement of symptoms within those with emphysema, COPD and pulmonary fibrosis. However, when lifestyle changes fail to improve your quality of life in the way that you may expect, it may be time to consider cellular therapy. Centers for Respiratory Health offers PRP-PBMC cellular therapy, which may improve your overall lung health and potentially allow you to Breathe Easier and improve your quality of life.

For more information on cellular therapy and what it could mean for your life moving forward, contact us today or call us at 866-638-4776. Our Patient Care Specialists and board-certified medical providers are ready to walk you through our treatment options, talk through your current health and medical history, and determine a qualifying treatment plan that works best for you.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

Lung Capacity: What Does it Mean?

Lung Capacity: What Does it Mean?

For those of us with chronic pulmonary conditions, we may frequently hear our doctors and other people refer to our lung capacity. With all of the terminology that gets thrown around with a medical condition, sometimes it can be confusing breaking everything down. In this post, we’re going to take a look at what lung capacity is, how it’s affected by pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or pulmonary fibrosis, and what you can do to increase your lung capacity.

What is Lung Capacity?

Total lung capacity, or TLC, refers to the maximum amount of air that your lungs can hold. Typically, men have a greater lung capacity than women. At rest a man’s lungs can hold about 1.5 pints of air, while women’s lungs can hold around 0.6 to 0.8 pints. However, most of us do not use our full lung capacity.

According to Jonathan P. Parsons, M.D., professor of internal medicine, associate director of Clinical Services and director of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine at the Ohio State University Asthma Center, “The lungs are over-engineered to accomplish the job that we ask them to do. In healthy people without chronic lung disease, even at maximum exercise intensity, we only use 70 percent of the possible lung capacity.”

Why is Lung Capacity Important?

Lung capacity predicts health and longevity. A 29-year study published in Chest concluded that lung capacity is a long-term predictor of respiratory mortality, and should be used as a tool for general health assessment. Because of this, people with chronic pulmonary conditions should pay particular care to monitoring lung capacity. Taking spirometry tests is a good way to measure lung function . A spirometry test takes several measures, such as how much air you can exhale in one second, called an FEV1 score, or forced expiratory volume in 1 second.

Our lung capacity naturally declines with age, starting at age 30. By the age of 50, our lung capacity may be reduced by as much as 50 percent. This means that the older you get, the harder it is for your lungs to breathe in and hold air. When we breathe in less oxygen, our body and cells also receive less oxygen, forcing our heart to work harder to pump oxygen throughout the body. The heart working overtime long-term can lead to heart failure. Earlier symptoms of reduced lung capacity include shortness of breath, decreased stamina and reduced endurance and frequent respiratory infections.

How is Lung Capacity Affected by COPD?

COPD affects the quantity of air that can move in and out of your lungs. The more advanced the COPD is, the harder it is for your lungs to breathe in and to exhale air. The more severe the stage of COPD, the lower the lung capacity and function. However, lung capacity and lung function are not the same.

While lung capacity refers to the maximum amount of air that your lungs are able to hold, lung function refers to how quickly you can inhale and exhale air from your lungs and also how effectively your lungs both oxygenate and remove carbon dioxide from your blood. Both lung capacity and lung function are affected by the various stages of COPD.

There are four stages of COPD: mild, moderate, severe and very severe. Here is a breakdown of the different stages of COPD based on FEV1 score:

  • Mild COPD: 80 percent or higher
  • Moderate COPD: 50-70 percent
  • Severe COPD: 30 to 49 percent
  • Very Severe COPD: Less than 30 percent

Can I Improve my Lung Capacity?

Yes! Lung function cannot be improved; however, lung capacity may be improved. Remember to always follow the advice and guidance of your doctor. Here are five easy steps for increasing lung capacity, adapted from a recent blog post that may help:

Take more Vitamin D. Some studies show that of those who increase their intake of Vitamin D in conjunction with standard rehabilitation, many show improvement in their ability to exercise and in respiratory strength. Vitamin D helps reduce inflammation, which is a key issue for people with COPD.

Increase your Self-Confidence. Several people with COPD participated in an exercise study, which found that those who underwent a confidence boosting program before starting the exercise routine experienced better results. Exercise is essential for people, and taking that one step further, having self-confidence improves your ability to exercise.

Keep a Clean Home. Dust and other allergens can cause more frequent flare-ups. Support your lungs by keeping your home as clean as possible. Consider removing items that collect dust from your home, such as curtains and tablecloths. Wash your sheets at high temperatures, and dust and vacuum regularly. Indoor air purifiers are another great way to improve the quality of air inside of your home.

Lung Capacity: What Does It Mean?

Exercise more. Each time you exercise, you improve your exercise tolerance level. Start slow, and be sure to check with your primary care physician before starting a new exercise regime. Simply walking in place while watching TV or walking around the block is a great place to start.

Practice breathing exercises. Breathing exercises are a great way to help your lungs. Start in a relaxed posture, so you’re able to breathe in and out more easily. Read Best Breathing Exercises for COPD for some great breathing techniques to try out.

 

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life. 

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Stage 3 COPD: Severe Stage COPD and You

Stage 3 COPD: Severe Stage COPD and You

As you know, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects everyone differently and at varying rates of progression. Stage 1 COPD or mild stage COPD is categorized by a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of about 80 percent or more of normal lung capacity based on the GOLD System, and stage 2 COPD is categorized with a FEV1 between 50 and 80 percent of normal lung capacity. In fact, there are four total COPD stages. After learning about COPD prognosis and life expectancy, stage 1 and stage 2 COPD, it’s time to take a closer look at stage 3 COPD.

Determining Stage 3 COPD

The COPD stages range from mild to very severe. At this point, you’ve probably had lung function testing, such as pulmonary function tests, spirometry and exercise tolerance testing. Your doctor will perform these types of tests, take a detailed medical history and take into account how COPD affects your life. If you’re in stage 3 COPD, you’re likely experiencing significant symptoms and changes in your pulmonary health and overall condition.

Determining stage 3 COPD is similar to determining stage 1 and stage 2 COPD. Your doctor may use the GOLD System and the BODE Index to categorize your stage of COPD.

In the GOLD System, stage 3 COPD is categorized as severe COPD with a FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in one second) between 30 and 50 percent of normal lung capacity.

Stage 3 COPD

During stage 3 COPD, you will likely experience significant lung function impairment. Many patients will experience an increase in COPD flare-ups or exacerbations. For some people, the increase in flare-ups means they could need to be hospitalized at times as well.

Increased breathlessness and more fatigue make it difficult to perform daily tasks, enjoy your favorite activities and to exercise. Simply put, people in stage 3 COPD become exhausted more easily. Because COPD is a progressive disease, it will continue to worsen over time. At this stage of COPD, many people see their doctors regularly.

Stage 3 COPD Treatment Options

Stage 3 COPD: Severe Stage COPD and You

As your COPD progresses, you’ll likely need to have more pulmonary function tests. Your doctor will use your lung function tests to help keep track of how your lungs are doing and how well your COPD treatments are working. Many doctors compare old pulmonary function tests with more recent ones. Your doctor will also keep track of your overall health. While there isn’t a cure for COPD, treatment options are available.

You and your doctor will continue to work together to manage and reduce your COPD symptoms, prevent flare-ups and modify your treatment plan as needed. The COPD treatments you used in stage 1 COPD or stage 2 COPD might need to be changed when you’re in stage 3 COPD.

Your doctor may prescribe medications, such as combination inhalers, short and long-acting bronchodilators, oxygen therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation.

In addition to these medications and therapies, your doctor will likely recommend staying up-to-date on your flu and pneumonia vaccines to help prevent COPD flare-ups. People with COPD are at a greater risk for catching possibly life-threatening colds, flus, viruses and infections, so prevention is key.

In the event of a flare-up, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics, corticosteroids and even hospitalization. It’s important to see your doctor regularly even if you’re feeling well. However, it’s highly important to report any changes in your lung health, breathing, COPD symptoms or overall health to your doctor immediately.

Stage 3 COPD Lifestyle Modifications

In any stage of COPD, there are lifestyle modifications that can help reduce your COPD flare-up risk, manage your symptoms and even improve your quality of life. One of the most important changes you can make is to quit smoking. In addition to quitting smoking, avoiding your triggers, getting plenty of exercise and eating a healthy diet help people live a more active life.

Alternative therapies also have the potential to improve quality of life. For example, people who had cellular therapy reported feeling better, doing more of their favorite activities and experienced improvements in lung function. In fact, many patients were able to reduce their oxygen therapy use after treatment.

While medications only work to manage and reduce COPD symptoms, cellular therapy may help to promote healing from within the lungs, potentially improving breathing and quality of life. Cellular therapy can help people in any stage of COPD, including stage 3 COPD.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment

Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment

Living with ILD isn’t easy. It’s why we’re here to help.

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an umbrella term for a general type of lung disease that encompasses more than 100 different types of pulmonary conditions affecting oxygen absorption within the lungs. For those who suffer from the disease, it can present symptoms such as fatigue, dry cough, weight loss, acute pneumonia, cyanosis (bluish discoloration of the skin), and shortness of breath during rest or exertion.

Needless to say, the expression of these symptoms can be incredibly unpleasant for those with this form of chronic lung disease. And though there are forms of treatment available, it’s important to understand your disease and how to navigate it in order to keep yourself in the best health possible.

Thankfully, that’s where we come in.

With your health in mind, the Lung Health Institute is here to breakdown Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages, Prognosis and Treatment in order to give you the information you need to improve your health one day at a time.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Stages

We’ll begin with the most important: ILD stages, because it has a direct effect on your potential life expectancy. In determining the progression and advancement of your interstitial lung disease, your physician or pulmonologist will typically go through two primary methods of judging your respiratory health: the GOLD System and the BODE Index. These two tests are designed to assess your pulmonary condition through a variety of different tests such as a spirometry assessment (or PFT), as well as several other metrics like a 6-minute walk test, oximeter results, and arterial blood-gas analysis.

This can sound like a lot, but trust us, the more information your doctor or pulmonologist can gather, the better. It’ll give them the maximum amount of information available in order to create the best treatment plan for your health.

The typical breakdown of ILD stages are as follows:

  • Mild- meaning you have 5+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Moderate- meaning you have 3-5+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Severe- meaning you have 3+ years with appropriate treatment
  • Advanced- meaning you have < 3 years with appropriate treatment

Although these are the general guidelines of ILD staging, as with any progressive lung disease, these life expectancies are largely dependent on the individual. This means that through proper treatment, diet and exercise, it’s possible to exceed these figures while maintaining a healthy quality of life.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Prognosis

Interstitial Lung Disease Prognosis

In the treatment of any disease there’s initially a prognosis given. A prognosis, in short, is essentially an outlook on your disease’s eventual progression. It’s a directive on what the development of the disease will look like moving forward and how it will affect you.

In the case of ILD, the prognosis largely depends on the treatment regimen as well as cause of the disease’s development, but generally you can expect the following developments in your health:

  • Fatigue
  • Cyanosis
  • Weight loss
  • Acute pneumonia
  • Shortness of breath
  • Weight loss
  • Abnormal enlargement of the fingernail base
  • Dry, persistent cough
  • High blood pressure (in some cases)
  • Heart failure (in some cases)

With a clear understanding of what’s to come and a strong grasp of your disease, it’s time to talk about what you can do about it, and how a few changes to your lifestyle and treatment options can have a big effect on your overall health.

Interstitial Lung Disease: Treatment Options

In treating ILD you have a variety of medical treatment options ranging from inhalers, medication, cellular therapy and supplemental oxygen. And though these treatment options have shown efficacy in addressing the symptoms of lung disease—and in the case of cellular therapy, disease progression overall—there are a variety of things you can do today that can give your health and life expectancy a small boost.

To start:

  • Quit Smoking Not only can it actively take years off of your life, but it is likely to make your disease symptoms significantly worse. And trust, although the symptoms of ILD may not be bad enough for you to change now, by the time they progress to the point of being unbearable, it may be too late to go back.
  • Change Your Diet – It doesn’t have to be as extreme as never eating meat again and going vegetarian. Start with portions. Try to eat more grains (rice and pasta) than you eat meat. From there, drop the pasta and add in more vegetables. If you want to eat dessert, swap that out with some good and well-prepared fruit. Even strawberries with a little whipped or cream cheese would be a healthier pairing than a big German chocolate cake.
  • Get Out and Exercise We say this one a lot but it’s important to get your blood pumping and moving through your body easier. Why? Because your blood carries your oxygen to the parts of the body that need it. Even if it’s doing standing squats in front of the TV or walking to the mailbox, start small and build up from there. If you can keep yourself disciplined and consistent in your goals, you’ll be walking marathons in no time.

Moving Forward with Interstitial Lung Disease

A diagnosis of ILD is by no means the end. In fact, it’s just the beginning of your journey to better health and a better quality of life. And the first step is quitting smoking if you haven’t already. Even though we always recommend quitting smoking first as a crucial step to better health, the second is to address your general health through simple diet and exercise.

With these behavioral changes, it’s possible to greatly affect the pronouncement of symptoms within those with emphysema, COPD and pulmonary fibrosis. However, when lifestyle changes fail to improve your quality of life in the way that you may expect, it may be time to consider cellular therapy. Centers for Respiratory Health offers PRP-PBMC cellular therapy, which may improve your overall lung health and potentially allow you to Breathe Easier and improve your quality of life.

For more information on cellular therapy and what it could mean for your life moving forward, contact us today or call us at 866-638-4776. Our Patient Care Specialists and board-certified medical providers are ready to walk you through our treatment options, talk through your current health and medical history, and determine a qualifying treatment plan that works best for you.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

5 Medications That Could Be Making Your COPD Worse

5 Medications That Could Be Making Your COPD Worse

When you’re not feeling well, popping a pill is often the first line of defense.

Got a headache? Take some aspirin or ibuprofen. Allergies bothering you? An antihistamine will likely help.

Though medications like these may effectively relieve the symptoms they’ve been created to treat, sometimes they have unintended consequences.

In the case of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specifically, certain medications can actually make this condition worse.

These include:

  1. Opioids

The reason opioids are on the list is because they can slow down the respiratory system—an effect called respiratory depression—making it even harder for someone with COPD to breathe. If taken in large enough doses, they can even result in coma or death.

This risk is compounded even more when opiate-based drugs like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine are combined with benzodiazepines. That’s why, as of August 31, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that these classes of medications contain boxed warnings, “the FDA’s strongest warning,” to educate doctors and patients of this increased risk.

  1. Antihistamines

People typically take antihistamines for allergies, but they may also be taken to help treat colds, motion sickness, vertigo, and even anxiety. However, whether prescription or over the counter, they too can also potentially depress the respiratory system, resulting in the same effect as opioid-based medicines.

In fact, some researchers suggest that this effect on the respiratory system is so strong that antihistamines may actually contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), a condition in which a baby dies during his or her sleep for no apparent cause.

  1. Diuretics

With many doctors prescribing COPD patients a diuretic, this one may surprise you, but it made the list because of the fluids and electrolytes you lose when taking this type of drug, ultimately impacting your ability to breathe.

That’s why some researchers suggest that, if you are taking a diuretic, your electrolyte levels should be closely monitored. A potassium supplement, or potassium-sparing agent is recommended too.

  1. Beta Blockers

Beta blockers can potentially make your COPD worse in two different ways. First, sometimes they produce bronchial spasms, aggravating this condition. Second, they might also directly interact with beta-agonists, a medication that many COPD patients are prescribed by their primary care physicians.

  1. Antitussives

When you have COPD, it’s important that you’re able to cough, helping you get rid of the secretions in your lungs. Antitussives block this by suppressing the cough, making it more difficult to take a good, deep breath.

Because all these types of medication can potentially interfere with your COPD, it is incredibly important to discuss these (and all other medications) with your doctor before taking them—even if they are available over the counter or without a prescription.

If you or a loved one suffers from a chronic lung disorder like COPD, emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis or other symptoms of lung disease, Centers for Respiratory Health offers a variety of cellular treatment options. Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers is here to help ensure a smooth patient experience on your journey to BREATHE EASIER. Contact us today at 866-638-4776 to learn more about our innovative cellular therapy.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

Recipes for Lung Detox

Recipes for Lung Detox

A Healthy Diet for Healthy Lungs

According to the American Lung Association, the average adult takes 20,000 breaths each day. If you have been diagnosed with a chronic lung disorder, these breaths will be harder for you, so it is particularly important to eat healthy foods and drink healthy liquids so that your body is nourished and has the energy to support your breathing. There are many foods that you can eat to support lung function and lung detox, and we have compiled some recipes for you to try. Since it can be difficult to cook and eat when you’re suffering from lung disorders, we chose foods that are easy to make and consume. Begin your road trip to wellness with these recipes for lung detox that promote healthy lung function:

Rosemary and Garlic Roasted Salmon

Rosemary and Garlic Roasted Salmon

Salmon is high in omega-3s. A study published in Chest reported that those who consumed omega-3s saw a significant drop in lung inflammation and improved results on the six-minute walking test.

Ingredients:

  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 2 fresh 6″ rosemary sprigs, about 1 tablespoon chopped
  • 1 1/2 to 2 pounds of salmon, preferably Copper River Salmon
  • 1/8 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 425°.
  • Peel and chop garlic and rosemary and set aside.
  • Place salmon on a parchment-lined baking sheet.
  • Sprinkle with salt, pepper, rosemary, and garlic. Place in the oven and roast for 12 minutes or until the salmon is flaky.

Lung Rejuvenator Juice

Lung Rejuvenator Juice

This healthy juice contains watercress, which helps soothe swollen breathing passages and lubricates the lungs. Turnips are high in vitamin A and lemons contain vitamin C, which are both full of antioxidants and both will help promote lung health. Garlic is a natural antibiotic, antiviral and antibacterial.

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch watercress
  • 1 cucumber
  • 1 turnip
  • 3 large carrots
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 lemon

Directions:

Place all the above ingredients in a juicer, blend it and serve! If you don’t have a juicer, you can put these items in a blender, then separate the juice and pulp using a strainer. Enjoy this once or twice a day. This healthy juice is best absorbed on an empty stomach. This recipe is for one serving.

Lung Stimulating Smoothie

Lung Stimulating Smoothie

This tasty smoothie contains lemons and oranges, both of which reduce the production of free radicals in the body. They can help reduce phlegm, making it easier to breathe. Pineapple reduces swelling, and pineapple juice has been known to help reduce coughing. Additionally, pineapple contains the enzyme bromelin which helps the lungs remove debris and detox naturally. Peppermint contains menthol, which soothes and relaxes the respiratory tract. The lung stimulating smoothie can be consumed multiple times each day to help reduce symptoms. This recipe makes just over two cups.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup fresh orange juice (2 large oranges)
  • 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice (from about 2 lemons)
  • 1 tbsp raw honey
  • 1 piece of ginger (peel removed) 2″ long up to 1″ thick
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 cup chopped pineapple (can be fresh or frozen)
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp peppermint oil (or 5 peppermint leaves)

Directions:

Combine all ingredients in a high-speed blender, blend then serve immediately. You also can store half the smoothie in the fridge for a snack later.

Love Your Lungs Juice

Love Your Lungs Juice

Cilantro helps the body remove heavy metals, which have been linked to lung disease. Carrots are a great source of vitamin A. Celery is full of organic sodium, which helps eliminate carbon dioxide from the body. Ginger helps remove air pollutants and other irritants from your lungs before they have time to irritate the lungs. It also reduces congestion and improves circulation.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pineapple center (contains the most bromelin)
  • 3 celery stalks (the greener the better)
  • 2 carrots
  • Small handful of cilantro
  • 1 inch ginger root (peeled)

Directions:

Place all the above ingredients in a juicer, blend it and serve! If you don’t have a juicer, you can put these items in a blender, then separate the juice and pulp using a strainer. Enjoy this once or twice a day. This healthy juice is best absorbed on an empty stomach. This recipe is for one serving.

While diet can certainly help improve lung function, many cases of debilitating lung disorders require additional treatment. If you or a loved one suffers from a chronic lung disorder, Centers for Respiratory Health may be able to help.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers is here to help ensure a smooth patient experience on your journey to BREATHE EASIER. Contact us today by calling 866-638-4776 to learn more about our innovative cellular therapy.

 

 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.