COPD & Over-the-Counter Pain Meds

COPD & Over-the-Counter Pain Meds

COPD & Over-the-Counter Pain Meds

“Several studies have found high rates of pain medication use among COPD patients, and pain has also been an important determinant of overall health status and quality of life in COPD,” senior research associate, Melissa Roberts at the Lovelace Clinic Foundation in Albuquerque, NM, said in an American Thoracic Society news release.

Researchers determined pain levels among study participants by reviewing diagnostic codes and pain medication prescriptions in their medical records. Studies found that COPD patients have more indicators of chronic pain and use more prescription pain medications than patients without chronic disease.

“We found the prevalence of chronic pain among adults with chronic disease to be almost twice as high as among individuals without chronic disease,” Roberts said. “Among those with chronic disease, individuals with COPD were similar to those with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis in their experience of pain, but with even greater use of opioids.”

What about over-the-counter meds?

COPD is a lung disease, and although it doesn’t cause lung pain directly, it can cause chest pain due to factors such as coughing. Pain management can be overlooked for reasons such as a patient’s reluctance to adequately communicate their pain or due to all-too-common financial constraints on acquiring pain meds.

If you find you need to take over-the-counter meds to manage COPD-related pain, there are basically two types of over-the-counter pain relievers – acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Acetaminophen is an active ingredient in more than 600 medicines, including pain relievers, cough suppressants and cold medications. It’s important to understand that taking a higher dose than recommended will not provide more relief and can be dangerous.

Acetaminophen overdose can lead to liver damage and death. Risk for liver damage may be increased in people who drink three or more alcoholic beverages a day while using acetaminophen-containing medicines. Read and follow the directions on the label every time you use a medicine.

NSAIDs are common medications used to relieve minor aches and pains and to reduce fever. They include aspirin, naproxen, and ibuprofen and many medicines taken for colds, sinus pressure and allergies. NSAIDs act by inhibiting an enzyme that helps make a specific chemical.

NSAID overdose can cause stomach bleeding. This risk is higher in people who are over 60 years old, taking prescription blood thinners or steroids, have a history of stomach bleeding or ulcers and/or have other bleeding problems.

Using NSAIDs can cause reversible kidney damage. This risk may also increase in people over 60, in those taking a diuretic (a drug that increases the excretion of urine), and people with high blood pressure, heart disease, or pre-existing kidney disease.

Using over-the-counter pain meds too often can make your body immune to their effects. For this reason, the Get Relief Responsibly® advises against taking pain relievers more than twice per week. If you’re in constant or excessive pain associated with COPD, ask your physician about pain management.

Alternative Methods for Alleviating Pain

  • Practice breathing exercises (meditation, yoga)
  • Drink peppermint tea
  • Get more sleep
  • Avoid sleeping in
  • Exercise regularly
  • Avoid COPD triggers (smoke, chemicals, dust)

We Can Help

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Oxygen Levels and the Digestive System

Oxygen Levels and the Digestive System

It might sound strange, but the respiratory system and the digestive system depend on one another for optimal function. Because oxygen is essential to the proper functioning of the body, one of the main concerns for people with chronic lung disorders is maintaining enough oxygen in their blood. The body needs energy and oxygen, so let’s take a closer look at oxygen levels and the digestive system.

What does the digestive system do?

The digestive system breaks down food so that it can become energy for the body. The digestive system is comprised of a complex system of organs, nerves, hormones, bacteria and blood work together to digest food. Digestive organs include the stomach, small intestines, large intestines, liver, pancreas and gall bladder.

What’s the connection between the respiratory system, oxygen levels and the digestive system?

Oxygen Levels and the Digestive SystemThe respiratory and digestive systems work together to power the body. A properly functioning respiratory system delivers adequate oxygen to the blood. Because the digestive system breaks down food and uses muscular contractions to move food through the digestive tract, it needs oxygen to function properly.

In turn, the respiratory system depends on a properly functioning digestive system to provide the fuel it needs to work effectively. Each function of the body depends on other functions, and all parts of the body need fuel and oxygen.

What are the risks of having lung disease and digestive system conditions?

In many cases, oxygen levels and the digestive system go hand-in-hand. COPD and other chronic lung diseases carry a risk for certain digestive disorders. Because some foods and drinks can cause symptom flare-ups, it’s important to know what to eat and what to avoid. Foods such as dairy and cruciferous vegetables are linked to increased mucus production and gas. Certain foods can also make GERD symptoms worse.

GERD or gastroesophageal reflux disease is common among people with COPD. GERD is a digestive disorder in which the stomach valve that keeps stomach acid down weakens or malfunctions, allowing stomach acid into the esophagus. If stomach acid reaches the lungs, it can result in irritation, increased coughing and shortness of breath.

GERD Symptoms include:

  • Dry cough
  • Chest pain
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hoarseness or sore throat
  • Burning in the chest or throat
  • Sensation of a lump in the throat
  • Regurgitation of stomach contents

What can I do to improve my blood oxygen levels?

Oxygen Levels and the Digestive SystemTalk with your doctor about any new or worsening symptoms. See your doctor regularly, even if you’re feeling well. Now that you have information about oxygen levels and the digestive system, discuss your oxygen, food and exercise needs with your doctor. You and your physician can decide, together, on the best treatment plan for you.

Centers for Respiratory Health is an innovative leader of regenerative medicine dedicated to providing cellular therapies to help patients with chronic lung disorders and improve overall lung health. We offer an innovative wellness approach to your health and provide our patients with a potentially more effective way to improve overall lung health. Our goal is to improve our patient’s quality of life and help our patients Breathe Easier.

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life. 

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Stage 4 COPD: End-Stage COPD and You

Stage 4 COPD: End-Stage COPD and You

As you know, there are four total stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), ranging from mild to very severe. Stage 1 COPD is also known as mild COPD, and stage 2 COPD is the moderate stage at which recognizable symptoms often first appear. As COPD progresses, your COPD stage will also change to reflect the severity of your symptoms. Severe stage COPD, or stage 3 COPD, causes significant changes in symptoms, lung health and overall health. The final stage of COPD is also known as stage 4, or very severe. Here’s everything you need to know about stage 4 COPD or end-stage COPD.

Determining Stage 4 COPD

As in previous stages of COPD, your doctor will likely use the GOLD System and the BODE Index to identify stage 4 COPD. By this stage, you’ve likely had multiple lung function tests and exercise tolerance tests, such as pulmonary function tests and 6-minute walk tests. Seeing your doctor regularly is important during any stage of COPD, but it’s especially important during stage 4.

In the GOLD System, stage 4 COPD is categorized as end-stage COPD with a lower forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) than stage 3, or those with a stage 3 FEV1 and low blood oxygen levels.

Stage 4 COPD

During stage 4 COPD, many people have significant airflow limitations, which often drastically affect their lives. In fact, simple tasks, such as taking a shower, making the bed or cooking a small meal, leave them feeling exhausted and completely out of breath. While lung function can vary, typically during stage 4, lung function drops to 30 percent or less.

Your doctor will closely monitor your pulmonary health and overall health. Because COPD flare-ups worsen symptoms and can be life-threatening, your doctor will work with you to manage and prevent them.

If you experience low blood oxygen levels, your organs, cells and tissues are unable to receive enough oxygen. Oxygen is essential to a properly functioning body, but many people with COPD have difficulty getting adequate oxygen. Your doctor may prescribe oxygen therapy to help you receive more oxygen.

For some people, other conditions that can occur along with COPD may worsen as well, such a heart failure. If you notice a change in your symptoms or feel ill, your doctor will likely want to make sure you’re not having a COPD flare-up.

Stage 4 COPD Treatments

Stage 4 COPD: End-Stage COPD and You

COPD is a progressive disease, and there’s no cure. However, you and your doctor will work together to develop or modify your treatment plan to best fit your needs. There are many different treatment options, such as medications, lifestyle changes and alternative therapies.

For the management of stable stage 4 COPD, your doctor may prescribe inhalers, corticosteroids to help you breathe better. For example, your doctor may prescribe inhalers called bronchodilators, which help relax and open your airways. Your doctor may also prescribe steroids to reduce inflammation and prevent flare-ups.

Sometimes you may need a type of inhaler called a combination inhaler. Combination medications combine two types of medicine in the same drug, such as a bronchodilator and a steroid in the same inhaler.

In the event of a COPD flare-up, your doctor could prescribe antibiotics, oral steroids or even hospitalization. Remember to report any changes in your symptoms or overall health to your doctor. It’s also important to stay up to date on your flu and pneumonia vaccinations to reduce and prevent flare-ups from happening.

For many people, alternative treatment, such as cellular therapy has helped them get back to their favorite activities. In fact, some people have reported reducing their oxygen therapy use after treatment, feeling better and breathing easier. Cellular therapy works differently than traditional medications. While traditional medications can help manage COPD symptoms, cellular therapy may help to promote healing from within the lungs, potentially addressing disease progression.

Stage 4 COPD Lifestyle Changes

Your doctor may also recommend certain lifestyle changes. One of the most important lifestyle changes you can make is to quit smoking. Smoke is a lung irritant and trigger for COPD symptoms. While quitting smoking and remaining smoke-free is challenging, there are smoking cessation tips, treatments and groups to help you succeed.

Eating a healthy diet and getting plenty of exercise have been proven to help people with COPD enjoy a better quality of life. Too much salt can worsen COPD and heart problems, so try seasoning your food with herbs instead. Gentle exercises like yoga, walking and Tai Chi are excellent options for people in any stage of COPD with limited mobility.

Combining lifestyle changes, medications and alternative therapies, like cellular therapy, can help you live a more active life. COPD prognosis and life expectancy vary; however, from stage 1 COPD to stage 4 COPD, these treatment options are available.

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality of life. 

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

People living with emphysema often cope with difficult emphysema symptoms. These symptoms include shortness of breath, fatigue and coughing among others. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis fall under the larger disease category of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Emphysema, chronic bronchitis and COPD affect people differently. For some people emphysema progresses quickly, and for others, it progresses slowly. Because emphysema affects people differently, it is often hard for people to know their exact emphysema prognosis. Here is the information you need to know about emphysema prognosis and treatment options.

What is Emphysema?

Emphysema damages the lungs’ tiny air sacs (alveoli). The alveoli bring oxygen to the bloodstream. However, in emphysema, holes form in the inner walls of the alveoli. As emphysema progresses, the airways leading to the alveoli lose their elasticity. Eventually, the weakened air sacs collapse and trap oxygen in the lungs.

COPD, which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis, makes it difficult for people to exhale old air fully. When people with emphysema take a breath, the old air cannot get out completely, so new air cannot get inside. People with emphysema struggle to breathe and often have trouble receiving enough oxygen.

Your emphysema prognosis depends on how advanced your emphysema is and the severity of your emphysema symptoms.

Emphysema Causes

In fact, emphysema can result from a variety of causes. The most common causes include:

  • Genetics
  • Cigarette Smoking
  • Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency
  • Long-term Exposure to Environmental Air Pollutants

Emphysema Prognosis

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

Currently, there is no cure for emphysema, chronic bronchitis, COPD or other chronic lung diseases. To diagnose and better understand the severity of your emphysema, your doctor may take a detailed medical history, run tests and recommend certain procedures.

For example, many doctors perform pulmonary function tests (PFTs) to help them diagnose the condition, understand the severity and what treatments could work best. PFTs measure how well your lungs and current treatment plan are working.

Your doctor may also perform a 6-minute walk test to assess your exercise tolerance. In addition, chest x-rays, blood tests and CT scans may be needed. After performing tests, your doctor may place your emphysema into stages. The emphysema stages help you and your doctor better understand the severity of your symptoms and your emphysema prognosis.

Emphysema Stages

The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) created the GOLD System to place certain chronic lung diseases into stages. The GOLD System uses the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) measurement from a PFT to categorize emphysema and COPD. In the GOLD System, the emphysema stages are as follows:

  • Very mild or Stage 1: Very mild emphysema with a FEV1 about 80 percent or more of normal.
  • Moderate or Stage 2: Moderate emphysema with a FEV1 between 50 and 80 percent of normal.
  • Severe or Stage 3: Severe emphysema with FEV1 between 30 and 50 percent of normal.
  • Very severe or Stage 4: Very severe emphysema with a lower FEV1 than Stage 3, or those with Stage 3 FEV1 and low blood oxygen levels.

While these stages are helpful, nobody can accurately predict emphysema prognosis or emphysema life expectancy. However, doctors can use tests and procedures to estimate emphysema prognosis and life expectancy.

Hearing that there isn’t a cure may sound like a bleak emphysema prognosis, but there are treatment options available to manage emphysema symptoms.

Emphysema Treatment Options

Emphysema Prognosis and Treatment Options

Emphysema treatment options work to manage symptoms, so people can breathe better. Traditional treatments include bronchodilator inhalers, corticosteroids, combination inhalers, antibiotics and oxygen therapy.

Bronchodilators help open the airways and relax the muscles around the airways. Corticosteroids help reduce inflammation. Combination inhalers typically combine a bronchodilator and an inhaled corticosteroid into the same inhaler.

For an infection, antibiotics may be prescribed. Often, people with emphysema have trouble getting enough oxygen and experience low blood oxygen levels. Sometimes, oxygen therapy is used to help people maintain a better blood oxygen level.

Emphysema causes many people to feel short of breath, especially during activity. It’s normal to avoid doing activities that make you feel breathless. However, it’s been shown that even gentle exercises like walking strengthen muscles and improve stamina. Ask your doctor about what amount and type of exercise is best for you.

Diet can affect emphysema as well. Avoid foods that cause excess gas and bloating, such as fried foods, broccoli, cabbage and carbonated beverages. Try baked foods, steamed vegetables, fruit smoothies and water instead. Check out these COPDfriendly foods for more ideas, and remember to talk with your doctor before changing your diet.

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

 

 

 

Lung Capacity: What Does it Mean?

Lung Capacity: What Does it Mean?

For those of us with chronic pulmonary conditions, we may frequently hear our doctors and other people refer to our lung capacity. With all of the terminology that gets thrown around with a medical condition, sometimes it can be confusing breaking everything down. In this post, we’re going to take a look at what lung capacity is, how it’s affected by pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or pulmonary fibrosis, and what you can do to increase your lung capacity.

What is Lung Capacity?

Total lung capacity, or TLC, refers to the maximum amount of air that your lungs can hold. Typically, men have a greater lung capacity than women. At rest a man’s lungs can hold about 1.5 pints of air, while women’s lungs can hold around 0.6 to 0.8 pints. However, most of us do not use our full lung capacity.

According to Jonathan P. Parsons, M.D., professor of internal medicine, associate director of Clinical Services and director of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine at the Ohio State University Asthma Center, “The lungs are over-engineered to accomplish the job that we ask them to do. In healthy people without chronic lung disease, even at maximum exercise intensity, we only use 70 percent of the possible lung capacity.”

Why is Lung Capacity Important?

Lung capacity predicts health and longevity. A 29-year study published in Chest concluded that lung capacity is a long-term predictor of respiratory mortality, and should be used as a tool for general health assessment. Because of this, people with chronic pulmonary conditions should pay particular care to monitoring lung capacity. Taking spirometry tests is a good way to measure lung function . A spirometry test takes several measures, such as how much air you can exhale in one second, called an FEV1 score, or forced expiratory volume in 1 second.

Our lung capacity naturally declines with age, starting at age 30. By the age of 50, our lung capacity may be reduced by as much as 50 percent. This means that the older you get, the harder it is for your lungs to breathe in and hold air. When we breathe in less oxygen, our body and cells also receive less oxygen, forcing our heart to work harder to pump oxygen throughout the body. The heart working overtime long-term can lead to heart failure. Earlier symptoms of reduced lung capacity include shortness of breath, decreased stamina and reduced endurance and frequent respiratory infections.

How is Lung Capacity Affected by COPD?

COPD affects the quantity of air that can move in and out of your lungs. The more advanced the COPD is, the harder it is for your lungs to breathe in and to exhale air. The more severe the stage of COPD, the lower the lung capacity and function. However, lung capacity and lung function are not the same.

While lung capacity refers to the maximum amount of air that your lungs are able to hold, lung function refers to how quickly you can inhale and exhale air from your lungs and also how effectively your lungs both oxygenate and remove carbon dioxide from your blood. Both lung capacity and lung function are affected by the various stages of COPD.

There are four stages of COPD: mild, moderate, severe and very severe. Here is a breakdown of the different stages of COPD based on FEV1 score:

  • Mild COPD: 80 percent or higher
  • Moderate COPD: 50-70 percent
  • Severe COPD: 30 to 49 percent
  • Very Severe COPD: Less than 30 percent

Can I Improve my Lung Capacity?

Yes! Lung function cannot be improved; however, lung capacity may be improved. Remember to always follow the advice and guidance of your doctor. Here are five easy steps for increasing lung capacity, adapted from a recent blog post that may help:

Take more Vitamin D. Some studies show that of those who increase their intake of Vitamin D in conjunction with standard rehabilitation, many show improvement in their ability to exercise and in respiratory strength. Vitamin D helps reduce inflammation, which is a key issue for people with COPD.

Increase your Self-Confidence. Several people with COPD participated in an exercise study, which found that those who underwent a confidence boosting program before starting the exercise routine experienced better results. Exercise is essential for people, and taking that one step further, having self-confidence improves your ability to exercise.

Keep a Clean Home. Dust and other allergens can cause more frequent flare-ups. Support your lungs by keeping your home as clean as possible. Consider removing items that collect dust from your home, such as curtains and tablecloths. Wash your sheets at high temperatures, and dust and vacuum regularly. Indoor air purifiers are another great way to improve the quality of air inside of your home.

Lung Capacity: What Does It Mean?

Exercise more. Each time you exercise, you improve your exercise tolerance level. Start slow, and be sure to check with your primary care physician before starting a new exercise regime. Simply walking in place while watching TV or walking around the block is a great place to start.

Practice breathing exercises. Breathing exercises are a great way to help your lungs. Start in a relaxed posture, so you’re able to breathe in and out more easily. Read Best Breathing Exercises for COPD for some great breathing techniques to try out.

 

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life. 

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Lung Infection and COPD: Signs and Symptoms

Lung Infection and COPD: Signs and Symptoms

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive form of lung disease ranging from mild to severe. It is characterized by the obstruction of airflow into and out of the lungs, making breathing difficult. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis both fall under the category of COPD. Lung infection and COPD go hand in hand. A person with COPD has narrowed airways and inflamed air sacs, making him or her more prone to lung infections, which are sometimes referred to as pneumonia. Here are the facts you need to know about lung infection and COPD.

What is a Lung Infection?

Pneumonia, or a lung infection, occurs when bacteria, viruses and sometimes fungi collect in a person’s lungs and begin to grow. This causes the air sacs in the lungs to become filled with pus and liquid, making it more difficult for a person to breathe. Symptoms include chest pain and/or a frequent cough that’s different from the usual chronic cough that’s associated with COPD.

Pneumonia and COPD is a serious combination that should not be taken lightly. Damage from pneumonia can cause irreversible damage to lung tissue, with the most severe complication being respiratory failure. In fact, acute respiratory failure is one of the leading health concerns when a person with COPD develops pneumonia.

Can Lung Infections be Prevented?

Lung infection and COPD, while common, isn’t entirely unavoidable. However, there are steps you can take to protect yourself and your lungs. Many people develop pneumonia after having the flu. Because of this, getting a flu shot is an important safety precaution that a person can take to reduce chances of contracting pneumonia. Frequent hand washing is also key, as is staying away from people who are sick.

Eating healthy and exercising are also great ways to strengthen your immune system, which will not only reduce your chances of getting sick, but also lower the risk of experiencing COPD exacerbations.

Signs and Symptoms of a Lung Infection

Lung Infection and COPD: What You Can Do

Symptoms of a lung infection are very similar to COPD symptoms, which can make it difficult to diagnose. Because of this, it’s important to be aware of the symptoms of a lung infection and how they differ from those of COPD.

1) Fever

Normal body temperature is typically around 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit, but varies from person to person. An elevated body temperature, or fever, might be an indication of a lung infection. In addition to an elevated body temperature, or a temperature over 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit, chills and shaking are other symptoms of a fever.

2) Increased Shortness of Breath

Experiencing shortness of breath is a common problem for people with COPD. However, if the shortness of breath gets worse, it could be a sign of a lung infection. Additionally, rapid breathing and an increased heart rate may also be signs of a lung infection. Because of this, paying careful attention to your body and the severity of your symptoms is imperative in helping to catch a lung infection early on.

3) Changes in Mucus

If you notice that you are expelling more mucus when you cough, or that it has changed, these could be symptoms of a lung infection. When a person has a lung infection, their mucus tends to change color, have a thicker and stickier consistency, and sometimes will have a foul odor. Your mucus can tell you a lot about the state of your lungs.

4) Sharp Chest Pain

People with a lung infection typically experience a sharp, aching pain on one side of their chest that worsens when they breathe in deeply. This is called pleuritic chest pain. It can also feel like a tightness or pressure inside of your chest wall. While pleuritic chest pain isn’t always indicative of a lung infection, it could signify another issue. Sometimes pleuritic chest pain could be a problem with the lung or heart. With any type of chest pain, it is important to immediately seek professional medical attention.

Managing a lung infection and COPD isn’t an easy task. However, knowing what to look out for can help you catch an infection before it gets worse. If you think you might have symptoms of a lung infection, contact your primary care physician for an expert opinion. It’s always better to err on the side of caution when it comes to your health.

Many people with COPD have experienced a reduction in inflammation and other COPD symptoms after receiving cellular therapy. Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

 

 

 

 

 

at the Lung Health Institute. If you’re interested in learning more about how cellular therapy might help you, contact us today for more information.