Oxygen Levels and the Digestive System

Oxygen Levels and the Digestive System

It might sound strange, but the respiratory system and the digestive system depend on one another for optimal function. Because oxygen is essential to the proper functioning of the body, one of the main concerns for people with chronic lung disorders is maintaining enough oxygen in their blood. The body needs energy and oxygen, so let’s take a closer look at oxygen levels and the digestive system.

What does the digestive system do?

The digestive system breaks down food so that it can become energy for the body. The digestive system is comprised of a complex system of organs, nerves, hormones, bacteria and blood work together to digest food. Digestive organs include the stomach, small intestines, large intestines, liver, pancreas and gall bladder.

What’s the connection between the respiratory system, oxygen levels and the digestive system?

Oxygen Levels and the Digestive SystemThe respiratory and digestive systems work together to power the body. A properly functioning respiratory system delivers adequate oxygen to the blood. Because the digestive system breaks down food and uses muscular contractions to move food through the digestive tract, it needs oxygen to function properly.

In turn, the respiratory system depends on a properly functioning digestive system to provide the fuel it needs to work effectively. Each function of the body depends on other functions, and all parts of the body need fuel and oxygen.

What are the risks of having lung disease and digestive system conditions?

In many cases, oxygen levels and the digestive system go hand-in-hand. COPD and other chronic lung diseases carry a risk for certain digestive disorders. Because some foods and drinks can cause symptom flare-ups, it’s important to know what to eat and what to avoid. Foods such as dairy and cruciferous vegetables are linked to increased mucus production and gas. Certain foods can also make GERD symptoms worse.

GERD or gastroesophageal reflux disease is common among people with COPD. GERD is a digestive disorder in which the stomach valve that keeps stomach acid down weakens or malfunctions, allowing stomach acid into the esophagus. If stomach acid reaches the lungs, it can result in irritation, increased coughing and shortness of breath.

GERD Symptoms include:

  • Dry cough
  • Chest pain
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hoarseness or sore throat
  • Burning in the chest or throat
  • Sensation of a lump in the throat
  • Regurgitation of stomach contents

What can I do to improve my blood oxygen levels?

Oxygen Levels and the Digestive SystemTalk with your doctor about any new or worsening symptoms. See your doctor regularly, even if you’re feeling well. Now that you have information about oxygen levels and the digestive system, discuss your oxygen, food and exercise needs with your doctor. You and your physician can decide, together, on the best treatment plan for you.

Centers for Respiratory Health is an innovative leader of regenerative medicine dedicated to providing cellular therapies to help patients with chronic lung disorders and improve overall lung health. We offer an innovative wellness approach to your health and provide our patients with a potentially more effective way to improve overall lung health. Our goal is to improve our patient’s quality of life and help our patients Breathe Easier.

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life. 

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Lung Capacity: What Does it Mean?

Lung Capacity: What Does it Mean?

For those of us with chronic pulmonary conditions, we may frequently hear our doctors and other people refer to our lung capacity. With all of the terminology that gets thrown around with a medical condition, sometimes it can be confusing breaking everything down. In this post, we’re going to take a look at what lung capacity is, how it’s affected by pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or pulmonary fibrosis, and what you can do to increase your lung capacity.

What is Lung Capacity?

Total lung capacity, or TLC, refers to the maximum amount of air that your lungs can hold. Typically, men have a greater lung capacity than women. At rest a man’s lungs can hold about 1.5 pints of air, while women’s lungs can hold around 0.6 to 0.8 pints. However, most of us do not use our full lung capacity.

According to Jonathan P. Parsons, M.D., professor of internal medicine, associate director of Clinical Services and director of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine at the Ohio State University Asthma Center, “The lungs are over-engineered to accomplish the job that we ask them to do. In healthy people without chronic lung disease, even at maximum exercise intensity, we only use 70 percent of the possible lung capacity.”

Why is Lung Capacity Important?

Lung capacity predicts health and longevity. A 29-year study published in Chest concluded that lung capacity is a long-term predictor of respiratory mortality, and should be used as a tool for general health assessment. Because of this, people with chronic pulmonary conditions should pay particular care to monitoring lung capacity. Taking spirometry tests is a good way to measure lung function . A spirometry test takes several measures, such as how much air you can exhale in one second, called an FEV1 score, or forced expiratory volume in 1 second.

Our lung capacity naturally declines with age, starting at age 30. By the age of 50, our lung capacity may be reduced by as much as 50 percent. This means that the older you get, the harder it is for your lungs to breathe in and hold air. When we breathe in less oxygen, our body and cells also receive less oxygen, forcing our heart to work harder to pump oxygen throughout the body. The heart working overtime long-term can lead to heart failure. Earlier symptoms of reduced lung capacity include shortness of breath, decreased stamina and reduced endurance and frequent respiratory infections.

How is Lung Capacity Affected by COPD?

COPD affects the quantity of air that can move in and out of your lungs. The more advanced the COPD is, the harder it is for your lungs to breathe in and to exhale air. The more severe the stage of COPD, the lower the lung capacity and function. However, lung capacity and lung function are not the same.

While lung capacity refers to the maximum amount of air that your lungs are able to hold, lung function refers to how quickly you can inhale and exhale air from your lungs and also how effectively your lungs both oxygenate and remove carbon dioxide from your blood. Both lung capacity and lung function are affected by the various stages of COPD.

There are four stages of COPD: mild, moderate, severe and very severe. Here is a breakdown of the different stages of COPD based on FEV1 score:

  • Mild COPD: 80 percent or higher
  • Moderate COPD: 50-70 percent
  • Severe COPD: 30 to 49 percent
  • Very Severe COPD: Less than 30 percent

Can I Improve my Lung Capacity?

Yes! Lung function cannot be improved; however, lung capacity may be improved. Remember to always follow the advice and guidance of your doctor. Here are five easy steps for increasing lung capacity, adapted from a recent blog post that may help:

Take more Vitamin D. Some studies show that of those who increase their intake of Vitamin D in conjunction with standard rehabilitation, many show improvement in their ability to exercise and in respiratory strength. Vitamin D helps reduce inflammation, which is a key issue for people with COPD.

Increase your Self-Confidence. Several people with COPD participated in an exercise study, which found that those who underwent a confidence boosting program before starting the exercise routine experienced better results. Exercise is essential for people, and taking that one step further, having self-confidence improves your ability to exercise.

Keep a Clean Home. Dust and other allergens can cause more frequent flare-ups. Support your lungs by keeping your home as clean as possible. Consider removing items that collect dust from your home, such as curtains and tablecloths. Wash your sheets at high temperatures, and dust and vacuum regularly. Indoor air purifiers are another great way to improve the quality of air inside of your home.

Lung Capacity: What Does It Mean?

Exercise more. Each time you exercise, you improve your exercise tolerance level. Start slow, and be sure to check with your primary care physician before starting a new exercise regime. Simply walking in place while watching TV or walking around the block is a great place to start.

Practice breathing exercises. Breathing exercises are a great way to help your lungs. Start in a relaxed posture, so you’re able to breathe in and out more easily. Read Best Breathing Exercises for COPD for some great breathing techniques to try out.

 

Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life. 

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Liquid Oxygen: Weighing the Pros and Cons

Liquid Oxygen: Weighing the Pros and Cons

If you have a condition such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or pulmonary fibrosis, chances are that you might have a prescription for supplemental oxygen. Supplemental oxygen has shown to be beneficial for many people with chronic lung disease by improving exercise tolerance and breathlessness during exertion.

Liquid oxygen, also called LOX, is different from concentrated, or “regular” oxygen. Concentrated oxygen tanks can be bulky and difficult to carry around, which is why some people choose to use the smaller liquid oxygen tanks. Let’s take a deeper look into what liquid oxygen is, and also weigh the pros and cons.

What is Liquid Oxygen?

Concentrated oxygen is oxygen in gas form, whereas liquid oxygen is oxygen that has been compressed into liquid form. That’s the major difference between the two. There are other smaller differences, and the type of oxygen tank that you choose will depend upon your personal preferences.

Concentrated oxygen tanks are much larger than liquid oxygen tanks. This is because when oxygen converts from a liquid to gas, it expands 860 times! To convert oxygen from gas to liquid, it must be cooled by at least -297 degrees Fahrenheit, or -183 degrees centigrade.

Which is Better? Concentrated or Liquid Oxygen?

A study published in Thorax respiratory medicine journal took a look at liquid oxygen versus concentrated oxygen for portable use. Liquid oxygen came out slightly ahead.

The study reports: “The longer duration of liquid oxygen supply enables patients to spend more time using portable oxygen and going out of the house.”

Here’s a breakdown of the other findings from the study:

  • All patients’ arterial oxygen tension values when they were breathing liquid oxygen and gaseous oxygen were similar
  • There were no significant differences between distance walked in the baseline walk test and the walk with liquid or gaseous oxygen
  • The level of breathlessness also appeared to be similar for both types of oxygen after the two walking tests
  • The baseline walking distance was greater after the eight weeks spent using liquid oxygen than at the initial baseline walk
  • There was no significant difference in walking distance after eight weeks of gaseous oxygen
  • There were no significant changes in spirometric values or arterial blood gas tensions throughout the duration of the study
  • Patients using liquid oxygen left the house on average of 19.5 hours a week, while patients using gaseous oxygen only left the house an average of 15.5 hours a week
  • Of the 15 patients tested in the study, 11 preferred the liquid oxygen because it lasted longer and carrying and filling it were both easier

Pros of Using Liquid Oxygen

Liquid oxygen takes up less space than oxygen in its gas form, making it easier and lighter to carry around. Not only that, it also can be stored at a much lower pressure. This makes liquid oxygen tanks safer than concentrated oxygen cylinders, which are under high pressure.

Liquid oxygen portable tanks are filled from reservoirs that can be kept in the home. They are easier to fill than concentrated oxygen tanks. Additionally, liquid oxygen lasts longer than concentrated oxygen. In fact, a small amount of liquid oxygen can last a full day, making it a great choice to take with you when you leave the house.

Cons of Using Liquid Oxygen

You have to keep large containers filled with oxygen in your home to frequently fill the smaller, portable tank. This not only takes up space in your home; additionally, the recurring oxygen deliveries can get pricey. Another important thing to note is that liquid oxygen needs to be used within a week or two; otherwise, it will evaporate.

Liquid oxygen is often used for more hours a week than concentrated oxygen, meaning you will be wearing your oxygen more. Some users have reported that the process of using liquid oxygen equipment is confusing and difficult to remember.

Who Uses Liquid Oxygen?

Convenience and efficiency are the two major deciding factors when choosing between liquid or concentrated oxygen. Speak with your primary care physician about both options, and he or she will help you arrive at a decision that best suits your lifestyle.

Some Centers for Respiratory Health patients have been able to reduce their reliance upon supplemental oxygen after receiving cellular therapy.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Using supplemental oxygen as part of a treatment plan is common for many people who have a chronic lung disorders, such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis. However, if you use oxygen therapy regularly, you could notice increased dryness in your throat, nose or mouth. Supplemental oxygen use can cause severe dryness, irritated skin and even nose bleeds. Here are some simple tips to prevent dryness from oxygen therapy.

What is oxygen therapy?

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Having a chronic lung disease makes getting enough oxygen difficult. Oxygen therapy can help people with chronic lung diseases receive sufficient oxygen to get through the day.

Oxygen is delivered through nasal prongs or cannulas, a mask or a breathing tube. People who require frequent supplemental oxygen are usually prescribed a portable oxygen tank or a machine for use at home.

Preventing Nose Bleeds

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Because of the constant flow of air, people using oxygen therapy can have nose bleeds. The skin inside of your nose is delicate and can become irritated, so a small bump with the side of the nasal cannula can break the skin. Some people who use a high flow of oxygen through a face mask can also have nose bleeds.

You can prevent nose bleeds caused from using supplemental oxygen by keeping your nostrils moist. You can try using a humidifier, a nasal moisturizer or a nasal spray. If you’re having frequent nose bleeds, it’s important to tell your doctor and ask what he or she recommends for you.

Preventing Dry Mouth and Throat

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Even though many oxygen concentrators have a built-in humidifier, people on supplemental oxygen often experience dry mouth and throat in addition to a dry nose. Using a humidifier can help moisten the air you’re breathing. Use only distilled water in your humidifier, and keep humidifiers, supplemental oxygen tubing and nasal cannulas clean.

Where can I find nasal moisturizers and humidifiers?

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Your doctor is likely to know local medical supply stores that carry nasal moisturizers and humidifiers approved for oxygen therapy, so ask about which products to use and how to use those products safely. Always check with your doctor before modifying your treatment plan. These products can be found at a local store or ordered on Amazon.

Here are some products to discuss with your doctor at your next appointment:

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Moisturizers

Ayr Gel Saline Nasal Gel

Cann-Ease Nasal Moisturizer

RoEzIt Dermal Care for Oxygen Patients

Humidifiers

Honeywell Germ Free Cool Mist Humidifier, HCM-350

Ultrasonic Cool Mist Humidifier

Are there other options for people with lung disease?

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

We hope these tips to prevent dryness from oxygen therapy help you breathe easier. In combination with your treatment plan, supplemental oxygen, pulmonary rehabilitation, and alternative treatment options such as cellular therapy, there are ways to help you live the life you want to live.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Oxygen Levels: What Do My Numbers Mean?

Oxygen Levels: What Do My Numbers Mean?

Oxygen levels don’t have to be confusing. Let’s make sense of them together.

Let’s start with the obvious: what are oxygen levels? And from there, what do they mean? If you live with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis (PF) or emphysema, oxygen levels are an undoubtedly important measurement, and here’s why: they allow you to measure how much oxygen your red blood cells are carrying.

Why is that important?

The importance behind this metric is that by measuring your blood oxygen levels, you can alter your behaviors and lifestyle to positively improve these levels and possibly help reduce your symptoms and feelings of breathlessness. In essence, the oxygen that is being carried by your red blood cells throughout your body allows your body to thrive and maintain homeostasis (when your body runs healthily). To aid in this process, the delivery of oxygen through red blood cells in your blood cells is vital.

So, how can I affect this?

There are a variety of ways to positively improve your blood oxygen levels to help relieve your symptom expression and boost your energy levels. And with your health in mind, Centers for Respiratory Health is here to help by giving insight to your Oxygen Levels: What Do My Numbers Mean?

Oxygen Levels- An Overview

As we’ve mentioned above, the measurement of your oxygen levels is pretty important to your overall health. It allows you to adjust and change your behavior based on your oxygen levels for the betterment of your breathing and condition. But what are blood oxygen levels and what do they mean?

Here’s a quick anecdote:

Imagine for a second that your blood vessels make up a giant subway network. The tunnels of this network are your veins and the train itself is your blood. Multiple carts (your blood cells) make up the train, and the people inside them are oxygen. As this subway (again your blood) travels through the network (your body), it’s dropping people off at various stops within your body. The question, however, is how many people (oxygen) are in each car of the subway? And is there a way to pack more in them?

This fundamental scenario is blood oxygen saturation in a nut shell and explains the importance of your body’s ability to retain oxygen within your red blood cells. In short, you want each of these cells jam packed with oxygen for delivery throughout your body to maintain and boost your energy levels and overall health.

So, What’s Normal and What Isn’t?

Your body’s oxygen levels can be measured using a variety of different techniques:

  • Arterial blood gas test (ABG)—which measures your blood’s oxygen level by drawing blood.
  • Pulse oximetry—which places a clip device on your finger and measures O2 levels.

A normal ABG blood oxygen level for healthy lungs will usually fall between 80 and 100 millimeters. If using a pulse oximeter, this reading should typically be between 95 and 100 percent.

In the case of severe COPD on the other hand, an expected pulse oximetry level is likely to be between 88 to 92 percent. Some people’s oxygen level measurements may be lower.

When your blood oxygen level gets too low (hypoxemia), there are several symptoms that you will be able to recognize:

  • shortness of breath
  • chest pain
  • confusion
  • headache
  • rapid heartbeat
  • possible cyanosis (blue discoloration of the nail beds, skin and mucus membranes)

Methods that May Improve My Oxygen Levels

Oxygen Levels: What Do My Numbers Mean?

Thankfully, to combat low blood oxygen levels there are several ways to raise them. First, if your blood oxygen level is particularly low, it may be wise to consider getting on supplemental oxygen therapy if your doctor hasn’t already prescribed it. In addition, always talk with your doctor about your oxygen level questions and concerns.

Adding to this, by raising the amounts of hemoglobin within the body through the ingestion of specific foods, it’s possible to positively impact your blood oxygen levels. When your body has the nutrients it needs, it has a better ability to deliver oxygen more efficiently as well.

To start:

  • Eat Shrimp—they are a good low calorie protein and filled with important vitamins, nutrients and antioxidants.
  • Have an Orange—there are several things to love about the orange, particularly orange juice. The bonus is that they’re excellent sources of fiber, vitamin C and other critical acids and nutrients.
  • Drink Some Almond Milk– Vitamin D is important, but so is avoiding any excessive phlegm build-up. Instead, pick up some almond milk. It tastes better and won’t leave you as gassy or bloated.

Moving Forward with Your Oxygen Levels

Living with a chronic lung disease like COPD, pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema doesn’t have to be as difficult as it may seem. By taking the time to better understand your disease and how to address issues such as your blood oxygen level, it’s possible to improve your overall health and quality of life. Although these steps can be difficult as they require changing personal behavior from diet and exercise to your medication, change is possible.

With a few behavioral changes, it’s possible to greatly affect the pronouncement of symptoms within those with COPD, emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis. However, when lifestyle changes fail to improve your quality of life in the way that you may expect, it may be time to consider cellular therapy. Rather than addressing the symptoms of lung disease, cellular therapy may directly affect disease progression and may improve quality of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

Elevation and its Effect on Lung Disease

Elevation and its Effect on Lung Disease

From the lowest basins to the highest peaks, elevation can affect your breathing.

Badwater Basin in Death Valley, California is the lowest point in the U.S. coming in at 282 feet below sea level. However, when it comes to low altitudes (below 4,000 feet), the negative and positive effects on health don’t begin until you start traveling up. For those with a lung disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), it’s important to know the potentially negative and positive attributes of Elevation and its Effect on Lung Disease.

With your health in mind, Centers for Respiratory Health is here to give you the information you need to be healthy when living in low or high elevations.

Long-Term Benefits of High Altitude

Elevation and its Effect on Lung Disease

Contrary to popular belief, there is no less oxygen in the air at higher altitudes. Rather, the air pressure is substantially lower, meaning air particles are farther apart and oxygen in the air is less accessible. However, when the body can adapt to this change in air pressure, it has wondrous effects on individual health.

Once the body is able to adapt by acclimation, there are several changes to respiration. The lungs become larger, which enables them to take in more oxygen. The body also produces more red blood cells and capillaries, enabling the lungs to more efficiently oxygenate the blood.

Among the highest cities in the U.S. – particularly in Colorado – there is a significantly lower overall mortality rate for permanent residents. People living at an average elevation of 5,967 feet enjoy a lower chance of dying from ischemic heart disease, a higher rate of Vitamin D production, a longer life span and improved muscular performance. As the highest state in the nation, Colorado is the leanest state, the fittest state, has the fewest deaths from heart disease and a lower incidence of colon and lung cancer compared to others.

Negative Effects of High Altitude

Elevation and its Effect on Lung Disease

However, there are a range of negative effects resulting from high altitude, and these negative effects are generally considered the signs and symptoms of high-altitude sickness. Unfortunately, these effects are greater on those with lung disease such as COPD.

For altitudes above 4,900 feet, it’s been said that “even modestly lower oxygen levels in people with already impaired breathing and gas exchange may exacerbate hypoxia (a condition where your body is deprived of oxygen) and pulmonary hypertension [leading to death].”

Everyone breathes faster and deeper in high altitudes and due to the lower air pressure, this change in barometric pressure can cause a decrease in the amount of oxygen available, leading to hypobaric hypoxia. Although many people travel to places of high altitude for leisure and sport, patients with lung disorders may be at an increased risk for complications in this environment.

What Elevation and Its Effect on Lung Disease Means for You

Elevation and its Effect on Lung Disease

Although there are some significant benefits to living in cities of high altitude, these conditions can be dangerous for those not properly acclimated to the conditions, particularly for those with chronic lung disease.

While there is no cure for lung diseases such as COPD, pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, cellular therapy may help improve overall lung health in patients with chronic lung disorders. With every passing year, the benefits of cellular therapy are felt by a greater number of patients and as cellular research continues to develop, the answer to addressing lung disease may be here.

Time can be a factor in any decision, so if you’re looking to take control of your health, don’t wait.

If you or someone you love has COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.