CT Masks for COPD

CT Masks for COPD

NOTE: THE CT MASK DOES NOT PROTECT YOU FROM COVID-19

CT Masks for COPD

Whether you live in a colder climate year-round or you experience a couple months of cold weather yearly, if you have a chronic lung disease, you understand how changes in the weather can affect your health.  People with COPD, or another form of chronic lung disease such as pulmonary fibrosis, may experience worsened symptoms during cold weather because the cold air is dry and removes moisture from the bronchial passages, creating inflammation which narrows airways. However, you can take proactive steps to keep your lungs warm. Besides wearing warm clothing and keeping oxygen tubing underneath your clothes, wearing a mask designed for people with lung disease, such as the CT Mask for COPD, could help you breathe more easily.

What is the CT Mask for COPD and how does it work?

CT Masks for COPD

Made by Air Guard Medical Products Co., the CT Mask was made to give people with lung disease, such as asthma and COPD, the ability to breathe warm, moist air outdoors in cold weather. Inside the CT Mask is a thermal exchange module, which affects a heat exchange cycle, regulating air flow through its chambers. The heat and moisture from your exhaled breath is captured inside the module and transferred into your next inhaled breath as warm, moist, fresh air.

What are the product details for the CT Mask for COPD?

  • Adjustable straps for the best fit
  • Durable enough for 90-120 washings
  • Hand-washable in warm water with non-allergic soap; air-dry
  • Made with soft Polartec fleece, antimicrobial copper mesh, Poron, and napped Lycra jersey materials

How cold does it need to be to use the CT Mask for COPD?

CT Masks for COPD

Each individual is different. For some people, temperatures in the fifties are uncomfortable. For others, temperatures in the forties and lower feel cold. If it feels cold outside to you, then it’s fine to wear your CT Mask.

What are the risks and benefits of wearing the CT Mask for COPD?

CT Masks for COPD

The CT Mask is not for everyone, and some people may feel that the mask restricts their airflow, causing them discomfort. If this happens, stop wearing the mask.

In addition to lung benefits, Air Guard Medical states that breathing warm air when you’re in cold weather helps keep your entire body warmer. The CT Mask should not fog eyeglasses when worn properly. Most outdoor activities can be enjoyed while wearing CT Masks. Before using the mask or changing your activity level, it’s important to discuss your activities and use of the CT Mask with your doctor. If you and your physician decide that a CT Mask is right for you, we encourage you to check your local stores for availability. The CT Mask is not available for purchase at Centers for Respiratory Health.

What else can I do to treat COPD?

CT Masks for COPD

With advancements in medications, lifestyle modifications, assistive devices, and alternative medicine, there is hope for people with lung disease. If you feel that your symptoms are worsened by cold weather, talk with your doctor about options to help you stay active, such as wearing a CT Mask for COPD. Trying various lifestyle modifications and treatment options, such as cellular therapy, could improve your quality of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.

Best Positions to Reduce Shortness of Breath

Best Positions to Reduce Shortness of Breath

People living with chronic lung diseases often experience shortness of breath. Most people feel that shortness of breath is one of the most concerning symptoms of chronic lung diseases. Chronic lung diseases make it difficult for people to breathe normally, so people often have trouble maintaining adequate blood oxygen levels.

The respiratory system brings oxygen into the body and delivers it to the body. The soft, spongy lungs don’t have any muscles within them, so they need surrounding muscles and bones to help them work. During shortness of breath, it can feel as though you aren’t able to breathe normally. We’re here to help with the information you need about breathlessness and the best positions to reduce shortness of breath.

What Muscles Are Used for Breathing?

To better understand shortness of breath, it’s important to know about the muscles used for breathing. Breathing can be a voluntary or involuntary act. For example, you can voluntarily hold your breath or take a slow, deep breath. Involuntary breathing occurs when you breathe without thinking about breathing at all, such as when you sleep.

Because the lungs themselves don’t contain any muscles, they need help from muscles within the body. The intercostal muscles are small and numerous muscles situated between each rib and on each side of each rib. The intercostal muscles help enlarge the chest cavity and contract to pull the ribcage both upward and outward as you inhale.

The diaphragm is the most important muscle to breathing. In fact, the diaphragm has its own nerve supply and can work involuntarily and voluntarily. The diaphragm works like a vacuum. When the diaphragm contracts during inhalation, it goes down toward the stomach, expands the lungs and pulls new air into them. During exhalation, the diaphragm relaxes and moves back to its original position. As the diaphragm relaxes, it and the intercostal muscles in the ribcage push old air back out of the lungs. The intercostal muscles also relax and reduce the space in the chest cavity.

Accessory Muscles

If you are under stress, have an injury or are experiencing difficulty breathing, accessory muscles can help you breathe. Accessory muscles are not used during normal breathing. The accessory muscles sometimes used from breathing include the muscles in front of the neck, the chest pectorals and the abdominal muscles. For people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), air becomes trapped in the lungs and makes it harder for them to expel air. Many people with chronic lung diseases use accessory muscles to help them breathe in and out.

What is Shortness of Breath?

Shortness of breath is a common and often frightening symptom of chronic lung diseases. Many people describe breathlessness as air hunger. Shortness of breath makes people feel like they cannot fill their lungs with oxygen. Sometimes, shortness of breath happens suddenly and without a known cause. It often occurs with chest tightness and anxiety.

If you experience shortness of breath, follow your doctor’s instructions and use prescribed inhalers as directed by your doctor. While frightening, remember to stay calm and consider trying the following positions to reduce shortness of breath.

Best Positions to Reduce Shortness of Breath

In combination with the pursed lips breathing and the diaphragmatic breathing techniques, these positions to reduce feelings of shortness of breath can help you relax and reduce the sensation of breathlessness.

Sitting Positions to Reduce Shortness of Breath:

Typically, shortness of breath happens during activity, emotional experiences, bad or changing weather conditions or when you feel tense or stressed. Try these sitting positions to reduce shortness of breath:

Sitting Position A:

Best Positions to Reduce Shortness of Breath

  • Sit in a chair or in a comfortable position
  • Keep your feet flat on the floor
  • Lean your chest forward a little
  • Rest your elbows on your knees
  • Place your chin in your hands (if you feel comfortable doing so)
  • Relax your neck and shoulders as much as you can
  • Practice your breathing techniques

Sitting Position B:

Best Positions to Reduce Shortness of Breath

  • If a pillow is easily available, place it on a table
  • Sit in a chair at the table
  • Keep your feet flat on the floor
  • Lean your chest forward some
  • Place your arms on the table
  • Relax your head on your forearms (if a pillow isn’t available) or rest your head on the pillow
  • Use your breathing techniques

Standing Positions to Reduce Shortness of Breath:

Sometimes, shortness of breath happens suddenly. If a chair or a place to do the sitting positions isn’t available, give a standing position to reduce shortness of breath a try:

Standing Position A:

  • Find a sturdy wall
  • Stand with your feet shoulder width apart
  • Lean your hips on the wall
  • Let your hands rest on your thighs
  • Allow your shoulders to relax
  • Lean forward slightly
  • Let your arms dangle in front of you
  • Remember to practice your breathing techniques

Best Positions to Reduce Shortness of Breath

Standing Position B:

  • Find a strong piece of furniture (just below shoulder height), such as a table
  • Stand at the furniture
  • Place your elbows or hands on the chosen furniture
  • Lean forward a little
  • Relax your neck and shoulders
  • You can rest your head on your forearms if your elbows are on the furniture
  • Utilize your breathing techniques

Sleeping Positions to Reduce Shortness of Breath:

If you’re at home or are awakened by an episode of shortness of breath, remain calm and consider these sleeping positions to reduce shortness of breath:

Sleeping Position A:

  • Lie on your side
  • Place a pillow between your knees
  • Elevate your head with a pillow or two
  • Keep your back as straight as possible
  • Relax and use your breathing techniques

Best Positions to Reduce Shortness of Breath

Sleeping Position B:

  • Lie on your back
  • Place a pillow under your knees, so your knees are bent
  • Elevate your head with a pillow or two
  • Allow yourself to relax
  • Practice your breathing techniques

Taking Steps Toward Easier Breathing

Following your doctor’s advice, taking your medications properly and learning about all of your treatment options helps you stay proactive in your healthcare. In combination with your current treatment plan and breathing techniques, we hope these positions to reduce shortness of breath help you stay calm and breathe easier.

For many people, cellular therapy has helped them improve their quality of life, allowing them to spend more time with their family, grandchildren and loved ones. Unlike traditional treatments that often mask the symptoms of lung disorders, the goal of our innovative cellular therapy is to help manage symptoms and potentially improve overall lung health and quality of life. Our integrated wellness approach has the potential to improve overall lung health and to offer a better quality  of life. 

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Incentive Spirometry Benefits

Incentive Spirometry Benefits

People living with chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis, experience similar lung disease symptoms. Shortness of breath and decreased lung function make breathing difficult. Sometimes, doctors recommend their patients use an incentive spirometer. Incentive spirometers are prescribed after surgery or as part of a lung disease treatment plan. Here are the facts you need to know about incentive spirometry benefits.

What Do Incentive Spirometers Do?

Incentive spirometers gently exercise the lungs and aid in keeping the lungs as healthy as possible. The device helps retrain your lungs how to take slow and deep breaths. An incentive spirometer helps increase lung capacity and improves patients’ ability to breathe.

Tying to manage medications, doctors’ instructions and your lung disease symptoms can feel overwhelming and like you have no control over your healthcare. Using an incentive spirometer lets you take charge of your lung health. When you use your incentive spirometer as instructed by your doctor, you actively help your lungs learn how to work better.

How Do You Use an Incentive Spirometer?

Incentive Spirometry Benefits

There different types of incentive spirometers. Because of the variety of incentive spirometers available, follow the instructions for your specific type of spirometer. Ask your doctor or respiratory therapist to teach you how to use your device. Any type of spirometer will help you and your lungs. Always follow your doctor’s instructions.

What are the Incentive Spirometry Benefits?

Incentive Spirometry Benefits

There are several incentive spirometry benefits. Using your incentive spirometer exercises your lungs, measures how well your lungs fill with air and helps keep your tiny air sacs (alveoli) inflated.

Keeping your alveoli inflated and working properly helps your lungs exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide more effectively.

Experiencing the incentive spirometry benefits is easy when you use your device as directed. At first, you may not reach your incentive spirometry goals. Don’t let that discourage you from using your device.

Remember, it takes time to retrain your lungs. Keep using your incentive spirometer to get the most out of the incentive spirometry benefits.

Some people like to track their progress in their treatment journal. Write down your incentive spirometry measurements daily. This will help you monitor your progress, so you can celebrate your improving lung health successes.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

 

Top 4 Ways to Purify Air at Home Naturally

Top 4 Ways to Purify Air at Home Naturally

Experiencing flare-ups at home? Let’s make it a safer space.

Americans are estimated to spend as much as 90 percent of their time indoors. Although indoor settings may imply safe surroundings, these environments can hold a litany of harmful chemicals. Some of those chemicals include Toluene (paint thinners), Xylene (common tar), Ammonia, (fertilizers and cleaners) Benzene, and Trichloroethylene (man-made fibers and printed materials), and formaldehyde (insecticides and particle board). These types of toxins are inherently dangerous to all people but can be particularly harmful for those with respiratory illnesses such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

With your health in mind, the Centers for Respiratory Health has crafted a shortlist of the top four ways to purify your air at home naturally to keep you breathing healthy and reduce exacerbations.

 4. Salt Lamps

Top 4 Ways to Purify Air at Home Naturally

Himalayan Salt lamps are made of a pink rock salt mined in the Indo-Gangetic Plain, and when a rock of suitable size is found, it is converted into a salt lamp. By carving a hollow into the crystal and replacing it with an incandescent bulb, the heat that is emitted from the base emits negative ions into the air working to remove toxins in the air and neutralize them. Himalayan salt lamps are known decoratively for their beautiful pinkish glow but are also known to promote sleep and well-being.

Where You Can Find Them? Many online and local businesses carry salt lamps. A quick search online will result in several options.

 

 3. Beeswax Candles

Top 4 Ways to Purify Air at Home Naturally

Beeswax candles, are simply put, candles made out of beeswax. However, what makes them distinct from traditional candles is that they do not emit smoke. Traditional candles are typically derived from petroleum and may release benzene, toluene or soot into the air. In contrast, beeswax candles are known to produce negative ions in the air that help in the removal of air pollution and other toxins. Another benefit of beeswax candles is that they burn significantly slower than traditional wax or paraffin candles, meaning they last longer and won’t have to be replaced as often.

Where You Can Find Them? Many online and local businesses sell beeswax candles. A quick search online will result in several options.

 

 2. Purifying Plants (Peace Lily)

Top 4 Ways to Purify Air at Home Naturally

As we’ve mentioned before, plants are biologically engineered to take in carbon dioxide and convert it to oxygen. However, what often goes overlooked is that some specific types of plants also work to take in harmful chemicals and other pollutants such as benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and ammonia. Out of all air-purifying plants, NASA has suggested the Peace Lily as the most dominant, which requires very little water or sunlight. Not only is it aesthetically beautiful but actively takes in all the aforementioned toxins to produce oxygen.

Where You Can Find Them? Many local businesses sell purifying plants. A quick search online or visit to a local nursery will result in several options.

 

 1. Bamboo Charcoal

Top 4 Ways to Purify Air at Home Naturally

Also known as activated charcoal, bamboo charcoal is odorless and highly-absorptive. In some cases used as a makeshift water filter, bamboo charcoal can have the same affect in air purification by removing toxins and odor in the atmosphere. Packaged in a linen bag, bamboo charcoal works to absorb unpleasant odors, remove bacteria, harmful pollutants and allergens, and dehumidify air. However, the most remarkable aspect of bamboo charcoal is its longevity. Safe for children and pets, bamboo charcoal can rejuvenate itself if placed in sunlight once a month and can be reused for up to two years. Afterwards it can be used as a fertilizer.

Where Can You Can Find Them? Many online and local businesses carry bamboo charcoal. A quick search online will result in several options.

 

Clean air at home is critical to avoiding exacerbations, but despite even the cleanest quality of air flow, treatment may still be necessary to avoid flare-ups and fatigue in daily life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Using supplemental oxygen as part of a treatment plan is common for many people who have a chronic lung disorders, such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis. However, if you use oxygen therapy regularly, you could notice increased dryness in your throat, nose or mouth. Supplemental oxygen use can cause severe dryness, irritated skin and even nose bleeds. Here are some simple tips to prevent dryness from oxygen therapy.

What is oxygen therapy?

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Having a chronic lung disease makes getting enough oxygen difficult. Oxygen therapy can help people with chronic lung diseases receive sufficient oxygen to get through the day.

Oxygen is delivered through nasal prongs or cannulas, a mask or a breathing tube. People who require frequent supplemental oxygen are usually prescribed a portable oxygen tank or a machine for use at home.

Preventing Nose Bleeds

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Because of the constant flow of air, people using oxygen therapy can have nose bleeds. The skin inside of your nose is delicate and can become irritated, so a small bump with the side of the nasal cannula can break the skin. Some people who use a high flow of oxygen through a face mask can also have nose bleeds.

You can prevent nose bleeds caused from using supplemental oxygen by keeping your nostrils moist. You can try using a humidifier, a nasal moisturizer or a nasal spray. If you’re having frequent nose bleeds, it’s important to tell your doctor and ask what he or she recommends for you.

Preventing Dry Mouth and Throat

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Even though many oxygen concentrators have a built-in humidifier, people on supplemental oxygen often experience dry mouth and throat in addition to a dry nose. Using a humidifier can help moisten the air you’re breathing. Use only distilled water in your humidifier, and keep humidifiers, supplemental oxygen tubing and nasal cannulas clean.

Where can I find nasal moisturizers and humidifiers?

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Your doctor is likely to know local medical supply stores that carry nasal moisturizers and humidifiers approved for oxygen therapy, so ask about which products to use and how to use those products safely. Always check with your doctor before modifying your treatment plan. These products can be found at a local store or ordered on Amazon.

Here are some products to discuss with your doctor at your next appointment:

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

Moisturizers

Ayr Gel Saline Nasal Gel

Cann-Ease Nasal Moisturizer

RoEzIt Dermal Care for Oxygen Patients

Humidifiers

Honeywell Germ Free Cool Mist Humidifier, HCM-350

Ultrasonic Cool Mist Humidifier

Are there other options for people with lung disease?

Tips to Prevent Dryness from Oxygen Therapy

We hope these tips to prevent dryness from oxygen therapy help you breathe easier. In combination with your treatment plan, supplemental oxygen, pulmonary rehabilitation, and alternative treatment options such as cellular therapy, there are ways to help you live the life you want to live.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions. 

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time. 

Oxygen Levels: What Do My Numbers Mean?

Oxygen Levels: What Do My Numbers Mean?

Oxygen levels don’t have to be confusing. Let’s make sense of them together.

Let’s start with the obvious: what are oxygen levels? And from there, what do they mean? If you live with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary fibrosis (PF) or emphysema, oxygen levels are an undoubtedly important measurement, and here’s why: they allow you to measure how much oxygen your red blood cells are carrying.

Why is that important?

The importance behind this metric is that by measuring your blood oxygen levels, you can alter your behaviors and lifestyle to positively improve these levels and possibly help reduce your symptoms and feelings of breathlessness. In essence, the oxygen that is being carried by your red blood cells throughout your body allows your body to thrive and maintain homeostasis (when your body runs healthily). To aid in this process, the delivery of oxygen through red blood cells in your blood cells is vital.

So, how can I affect this?

There are a variety of ways to positively improve your blood oxygen levels to help relieve your symptom expression and boost your energy levels. And with your health in mind, Centers for Respiratory Health is here to help by giving insight to your Oxygen Levels: What Do My Numbers Mean?

Oxygen Levels- An Overview

As we’ve mentioned above, the measurement of your oxygen levels is pretty important to your overall health. It allows you to adjust and change your behavior based on your oxygen levels for the betterment of your breathing and condition. But what are blood oxygen levels and what do they mean?

Here’s a quick anecdote:

Imagine for a second that your blood vessels make up a giant subway network. The tunnels of this network are your veins and the train itself is your blood. Multiple carts (your blood cells) make up the train, and the people inside them are oxygen. As this subway (again your blood) travels through the network (your body), it’s dropping people off at various stops within your body. The question, however, is how many people (oxygen) are in each car of the subway? And is there a way to pack more in them?

This fundamental scenario is blood oxygen saturation in a nut shell and explains the importance of your body’s ability to retain oxygen within your red blood cells. In short, you want each of these cells jam packed with oxygen for delivery throughout your body to maintain and boost your energy levels and overall health.

So, What’s Normal and What Isn’t?

Your body’s oxygen levels can be measured using a variety of different techniques:

  • Arterial blood gas test (ABG)—which measures your blood’s oxygen level by drawing blood.
  • Pulse oximetry—which places a clip device on your finger and measures O2 levels.

A normal ABG blood oxygen level for healthy lungs will usually fall between 80 and 100 millimeters. If using a pulse oximeter, this reading should typically be between 95 and 100 percent.

In the case of severe COPD on the other hand, an expected pulse oximetry level is likely to be between 88 to 92 percent. Some people’s oxygen level measurements may be lower.

When your blood oxygen level gets too low (hypoxemia), there are several symptoms that you will be able to recognize:

  • shortness of breath
  • chest pain
  • confusion
  • headache
  • rapid heartbeat
  • possible cyanosis (blue discoloration of the nail beds, skin and mucus membranes)

Methods that May Improve My Oxygen Levels

Oxygen Levels: What Do My Numbers Mean?

Thankfully, to combat low blood oxygen levels there are several ways to raise them. First, if your blood oxygen level is particularly low, it may be wise to consider getting on supplemental oxygen therapy if your doctor hasn’t already prescribed it. In addition, always talk with your doctor about your oxygen level questions and concerns.

Adding to this, by raising the amounts of hemoglobin within the body through the ingestion of specific foods, it’s possible to positively impact your blood oxygen levels. When your body has the nutrients it needs, it has a better ability to deliver oxygen more efficiently as well.

To start:

  • Eat Shrimp—they are a good low calorie protein and filled with important vitamins, nutrients and antioxidants.
  • Have an Orange—there are several things to love about the orange, particularly orange juice. The bonus is that they’re excellent sources of fiber, vitamin C and other critical acids and nutrients.
  • Drink Some Almond Milk– Vitamin D is important, but so is avoiding any excessive phlegm build-up. Instead, pick up some almond milk. It tastes better and won’t leave you as gassy or bloated.

Moving Forward with Your Oxygen Levels

Living with a chronic lung disease like COPD, pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema doesn’t have to be as difficult as it may seem. By taking the time to better understand your disease and how to address issues such as your blood oxygen level, it’s possible to improve your overall health and quality of life. Although these steps can be difficult as they require changing personal behavior from diet and exercise to your medication, change is possible.

With a few behavioral changes, it’s possible to greatly affect the pronouncement of symptoms within those with COPD, emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis. However, when lifestyle changes fail to improve your quality of life in the way that you may expect, it may be time to consider cellular therapy. Rather than addressing the symptoms of lung disease, cellular therapy may directly affect disease progression and may improve quality of life.

If you or someone you love has COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), ILD (Interstitial lung disease), emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, or another chronic lung disorder, call us today at 866-638-4776 and learn more about what our innovative therapy has the potential to do for you. 

Our dedicated team of Patient Care Specialists and Board-Certified Medical Providers are standing by to answer all your questions.

Medical Disclaimer: This content is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with a physician with any questions that you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you read in this article. We strive for 100% accuracy, but errors may occur, and medications, protocols, and treatment methods may change over time.